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As Alta View students looked out of their classroom windows last year, they saw a strange shape taking place in the corner of the field behind the school.

What looked, at first, like a jumble of beams and blocks was no mystery, however. They knew they were watching the creation of the schoolhouse that would replace the Alta View students had attended since 1963.

The new, 700-student capacity school is the 12th in CSD to be rebuilt or renovated as part of an aggressive plan to upgrade and modernize educational facilities in all corners of the District. The school will open to the public for the first time on Thursday, Aug. 17 at a ribbon-cutting event. The ceremony will start promptly at 6 p.m., followed by an open house tour for students, families, faculty and the community.

The new Alta View has a new address: 917 E. Larkspur Dr., in Sandy. It is the second new facility to open this year; on Tuesday, Aug. 8, Midvale Middle debuted to applause from a crowd of hundreds.

The building will feature a security vestibule that will require all visitors to be seen by school staff before they enter the building, a large commons area filled with natural light and a grand staircase leading to second-floor rooms, a media center, activity room and a computer lab. In addition, the building will be equipped with state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems and voice amplification equipment for teachers in the classroom.

With completion of these rebuilds and the remodel underway of Indian Hills Middle, CSD will have fulfilled the $250 million bond approved by voters in 2010. It’s a goal achieved without raising taxes, while maintaining CSD’s AAA bond rating, and in keeping with founding vision of the five communities who, in 2007, voted to turn CSD it into an achievement-oriented district of distinction.
As the doors of Midvale Middle officially opened to the public on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, students didn’t just walk toward the school’s entryway — they ran. The energy was palpable as they hurried to see what the new classrooms, auditorium and gymnasium in Canyons District’s newest school looks like.

“Whoever designed this school was a genius,” one student body officer said. From the colorful exterior to the innovative interior, Midvale Middle is full of creativIMG_8494.jpge details that are meant to inspire learners to achieve their greatest potential, says Brian Peterson, lead designer of the school for VCBO Architecture, which worked with Hughes General Contractors to create the building. “Great architecture comes from one single idea, and the idea behind this building is that strength comes through unity of different, beautiful things,” Peterson said. “We designed this school not just for 6th, 7th, 8th grade kids, but for the whole community.”  

Members of the Midvale community, including Midvale Mayor Joann Seghini; City Council members Paul Grover and Paul Hunt; Utah Rep. Bruce Cutler, R-Murray; former Canyons Board of Education member Robert Green; and former Midvale Middle principals Sue Malone, Wendy Dau and Paula Logan, attended the event and took a VIP tour of the building. Canyons Board of Education President Sherril Taylor, Board of Education representatives Amber Shill, Nancy Tingey, Mont Millerberg and Steve Wrigley and members of Canyons' administration, including Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe were also in attendance. 

The building is one of eight new schools built by Canyons District through a $250 million bond approved by voters in 2010. With the opening of Alta View Elementary on Aug. 17 and next year’s completion of a remodel of Indian Hills Middle, Canyons will have completed 13 major improvements without raising taxes and while maintaining a AAA bond rating.

Midvale Middle was first built in 1955 as a red brick building situated at the heart of a quiet neighborhood. As it sits on its original footprint, the new building features a state-of-the-art auditorium, an energy efficient heating and cooling system, floor-to-ceiling windows, a student lounge, modern media center, courtyards, soccer fields and more. “I’ve lived a long time,” Mayor Seghini told the crowd of hundreds gathered at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. “What you have here in this school is a school of the future, not the past. You have a school that has no limits to your future. You have wonderful opportunities here.”

The school will host a back-to-school night on Friday, Aug. 18 for those who were unable to attend the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Parents can meet their students’ teachers from 5-7 p.m. and enjoy a free hot dog from 6-7:30 p.m.

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  • When architects of the new Midvale Middle suggested cloistering the library in a quiet corner of the building, the school’s Media Specialist said, “Sorry, but that just won’t do.”

    The library, she explained, should be at the center of the school. It should be an open, inviting space for students to hang out with friends, study, check email, or play an educational videogame. It should be a place to collaboratively explore, create, and even make noise — a place where students find common ground in common interests. 

    The architects agreed, and the communal design ethic they embraced is evident throughout the entire building, which opens to the public this fall. Students, their families, and members of the community are invited to a sneak preview of the new school at a ribbon-cutting ceremony and Open House on Tuesday, Aug. 8. A reception starts at 7852 South Pioneer St. Midvale UT at 5:30 p.m. and the ceremony will begin promptly at 6 p.m. 



    The red brick structure with its art deco embellishes reflects Midvale’s ethnically diverse and industrial, working-class roots, says VCBO Architecture Associate Brian Peterson. “It evokes strength, strength of unity and strength of purpose.” The school was originally built in 1955, and after 60 years of existence in its quiet Midvale neighborhood, it has become a part of the community.

    The new building will be equipped to accommodate 1,100 students on its original footprint. Amenities such as the state-of-the-art auditorium and TV broadcast room will expose students to a variety of educational experiences at a time when that’s what their fast-developing brains crave. Modern heating, cooling, and wiring will make for a more comfortable learning environment adaptable to the latest technologies. Floor-to-ceiling windows will let in natural light, and a student lounge equipped with programmable neon lighting is sure to be a crowd-pleaser. 

    The building’s tiered design helps it blend into the surrounding neighborhood, and its fields and multi-use space and catering kitchen will become a gathering place for neighborho19477724_10154412420351580_7460469104461181245_o.jpgod events. 

    With this fall’s opening of Midvale Middle and Alta View Elementary, and next year’s completion of the remodel of Indian Hills Middle, Canyons School District will have fulfilled promises made to voters as part of a $250 million bond approved in 2010. In all, the District will have completed 13 major improvements without raising taxes and while maintaining a AAA bond rating. 

    A Second Chance to Celebrate: Back-to-School Night

    Out of town for the ribbon-cutting? Don't fret. You'll have a chance to get acquainted with the new school during back-to-school night on Friday, Aug. 18, which doubles as a community celebration co-sponsored by the city of Midvale. Parents will have a chance to meet their students' teachers from 5-7 p.m., and enjoy a free hot dog from 6-7:30 p.m.
    When architects of the new Midvale Middle suggested cloistering the library in a quiet corner of the building, the school’s Media Specialist said, “Sorry, but that just won’t do.”

    The library, she explained, should be at the center of the school. It should be an open, inviting space for students to hang out with friends, study, check email, or play an educational videogame. It should be a place to collaboratively explore, create, and even make noise — a place where students find common ground in common interests.

    The architects agreed, and the communal design ethic they embraced is evident throughout the entire building. The red brick structure, with its art deco embellishes, reflects Midvale’s ethnically diverse and industrial, working class roots, says VCBO Architecture Associate Brian Peterson. “It evokes strength, strength of unity and strength of purpose.”

    The building, which opens next fall, was certainly cause for celebration for teachers who got their first look inside on Friday. Upon seeing his spacious and fully-equipped classrooScreen_Shot_2017-05-08_at_12.46.12_PM_copy.jpgm, seventh-grade science teacher John Henrichsen gave Peterson a bear hug. Currently, his students don’t have easy access to a clean-up station. In the new building, it will be within arm’s reach, saving Henrichsen precious instructional time.

    If the new building will be more efficient, it will also be more welcoming. Amenities such as, the state-of-the-art auditorium and TV broadcast room, will expose students to a variety of educational experiences at a time when that’s what their fast-developing brains crave. Modern heating, cooling and wiring will make for a more comfortable learning environment adaptable to the latest technologies. Floor-to-ceiling windows will let in natural light, and a student lounge equipped with programmable neon lighting is sure to be a crowd-pleaser.

    This building will be a resource for the entire community, Peterson said. Its tiered design helps it blend into the surrounding neighborhood, and its fields and multi-use space and catering kitchen will become a gathering place for neighborhood events.

    With this fall’s opening of Midvale Middle and Altara Elementary, and next year’s completion of the remodel of Indian Hills Middle, Canyons School District will have fulfilled promises made to voters as part of a $250 million bond approved in 2010. In all, the District will have completed 13 major improvements without raising taxes and while maintaining a ‘AAA’ bond rating.

    In the seven years since the bond was passed, Canyons has built a new Corner Canyon High, rebuilt Midvale Elementary, renovated Albion Middle, added seismic improvements to Sandy Elementary, a new Draper Park Middle, rebuilt Butler Middle, a new Butler Elementary, additions to Brighton and Hillcrest high schools, and rebuilt Mount Jordan Middle.

    Additionally, the District added air conditioning to every school that did not previously have cooling air; security vestibules at all elementary schools; a soccer field, tennis courts and athletic fields near Brighton high; upgraded Alta High and made other improvements to Canyons facilities.

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  • The wind howled and shook the balloons at Indian Hills Middle Thursday as community members gathered to celebrate the beginning of a remodel and addition to the school. But nothing could sweep away students’ excitement to get the project going.

    Whoops and cheers accompanied school leaders, administrators, local representatives and members of Canyons’ Board of Education as they ceremoniously turned over a shovel of dirt to mark the beginning of the final project made possible by a $250 million bond approved by voters in 2010. The project is scheduled to be completed for the 2018-2019 school year.

    “I have no doubt that many of you wondered if this day would actually be realized,” Canyons Board of Education President Sherril Taylor told the crowd. “Everything we promised you has been done.”

    The updated school will feature classrooms and collaboration spaces wired for the high-tech demands of a 21st-century education, it will be reconfigured to be more energy efficient, six new classrooms and a spacious cafeteria and commons area will be added with hallways filled with natural light. The school will be temporarily moved to the former site of Crescent View Middle while construction takes place.

    “We’re proud of this new addition to the Sandy community,” Indian Hills Principal Doug Graham said, as students cheered. “We promise you it will be a place of learning, a place of knowledge, a place of true human power.”

    Taylor recognized the attendance of representatives from Hogan Construction and FFKR Architects who will be working on the building, as well as District administrators and Rep. LaVar Christiansen, R-Draper; Utah State Board of Education representative Kathleen Riebe; Region 17 PTA Director Betty Shaw; Sandy Chamber of Commerce CEO and Canyons Education Foundation member Greg Summerhays; Draper City Councilman Bill Rappleye; Canyons Education Foundation President John Martindell; and Sandy Chief Administrative Officer Scott Bond.

    The remodel is the last of 13 projects promised by the Canyons Board of Education with the passage of a $250 million bond. In seven years since the bond was passed, Canyons has built a new Corner Canyon High, rebuilt Midvale Elementary, renovated Albion Middle, added seismic improvements to Sandy Elementary, a new Draper Park Middle, rebuilt Butler Middle, a new Butler Elementary, additions to Brighton and Hillcrest high schools, and rebuilt Mount Jordan Middle. A new Alta View Elementary and Midvale Middle are currently under construction.

    Additionally, the District added air conditioning to every school that did not previously have cooling air; security vestibules at all elementary schools; a soccer field, tennis courts and athletic fields near Brighton high; upgraded Alta High and made other improvements to Canyons facilities. 

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