Spring is here, and summer isn't far behind, which, for busy working parents presents the special challenge of how to keep kids occupied. Fortunately, Canyons School District offers a rich variety of summer learning opportunities for students of all ages. From summer camps that expose young children to the arts and sciences in a fun, relaxed atmosphere to online courses that allow high school students to earn credits toward graduation from the poolside, there's something for practically everyone — and at affordable prices.

Summer Camps
Learn to sing and dance like Moana, or draw a portrait of your family pet. Build a rocket and journey into outer space. Become a mad scientist and program videogames. Canyons District “Community Education” summer camps are much more than fun and games. They offer students a chance to tinker and dream, build friendships and social skills, and cultivate a love for lifelong learning. Weekly camps exist for all grades, from elementary through high school, and run from June through early August. Registration is open now and camps are filled on a first-come-first-serve basis. Weekly camp information and registration can be found at entrada.revtrak.net under “Community Education.” 

pdfFind out more about Community Education camps here


Get a Jump on High School with CSD’s Summer Semester
Summer Semester is Canyons District’s solution for high school students who want to get a jump on their studies or free up their class schedule for more electives. Registration for CSD’s Summer Semester opens April 16 and runs through May 25. Three classes are offered in a blended-learning format: computer technology, financial literacy, and participation skills and techniques (a physical education course required of all high school students). About 40 percent of the coursework can be done online, so students can take their laptop to the pool and do some homework while enjoying the nice summer weather with friends and family. Of course, it’s helpful if they live close to Mount Jordan Middle in Sandy where the face-to-face classes are being taught. The school is only one block away from a TRAX station so kids from all across the valley can take public transit to the class. The classes, which are filled on a first-come-first-serve basis, are for original credit only and run from June 11-28. Registration and payment can be submitted online at canyons.revtrak.net. The cost per half-credit class is $70.

pdf Find out more about Summer Sememter here.



Virtual High School
On the go this summer? No matter. High school students can earn original or make-up credit online in a variety of engaging courses through Canyons Virtual High School. With few exceptions, registration is open year-round. Course fees for credit recovery are $35 per quarter credit course. Click here for more information or to register.


SCHOOL-BASED CAMPS
Individual schools also host summer camps. Following is a sampling of offerings. For more opportunities, check with your neighborhood schools. 

ALTA HIGH ROBOTICS: Looking for a fun summer program that builds engineering, science and math skills? Look no further than Alta High’s Robotics Camp. You don’t have to be enrolled at Alta to participate or have any prior knowledge of mechanics or programming. The camp is open to all middle- and high-school-aged students (ages nine and up). Participants in the half-day program (8 a.m. to noon) will learn wiring, programming and manufacturing techniques, and take part in competitions by using their problem-solving to beat their opponents. Two, four-day sessions are being offered in June (25-28) and August (6-9) for $120 per session. The fee covers materials, snacks and a T-shirt.  Parents must provide transportation. For details, including registration information, visit the Hawks Robotics Team’s website.  Questions? Email Ronald Strohm, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

HILLCREST HIGH ROBOTICS: 
This camp is open to elementary and middle school-age youth interested in robot building and programming. Three, four-day sessions are being offered in July and August. Elementary camps run for two hours and cost $65.  Secondary-level camps cost $125 and run for half-a-day in the morning or the afternoon. In order to accommodate as many youth as possible, each child will be permitted to attend only one session. Each participant will take home new skills and knowledge, a T-shirt, and a small robot toy. Parents must provide transportation. For details, including camp dates and registration information, visit the Husky Robotics Team's website. 

BRIGHTON HIGH WOODWORKING:
 Brighton High is hosting a free, one-day woodworking class where students can learn concepts in design and engineering. The program is great fun for girls and boys in grades 7-10. There are three classes to choose from: June 19, 20 and 21. Each class runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Registration opens in mid-April. For more information, visit: http://bit.ly/woodclass or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
The Board of Education on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 approved the following administrative appointments for the 2018-2019 school year: 
  • Scott Jameson, currently assistant principal at Albion Middle School, promoted to principal of Alta View Elementary, replacing Karen Medlin who is retiring at the end of the school year.
  • Justin Matagi, currently assistant principal at Hillcrest High School, has been reassigned as assistant principal at Albion Middle School, replacing Jameson.
  • Matt Schelble, currently assistant principal at Brighton High School, has been reassigned as assistant principal at Hillcrest High School, replacing Matagi.
  • Justin Pitcher, currently principal at East Midvale Elementary School, has been reassigned as assistant principal at Brighton High School, replacing Schelble.
  • Matt Nelson, currently principal of Viewmont Elementary School in Murray District, is hired as principal of East Midvale Elementary School, replacing Pitcher.
  • Kip Carlsen, currently assistant principal at Midvale Middle School, reassigned as assistant principal at Butler Middle School, replacing Jody Wihongi who is resigning at the end of the school year.
  • Matt Watts, currently assistant principal at Midvale Elementary School, reassigned as assistant principal at Midvale Middle School, replacing Kip Carlsen.
  • Ashley McKinney, currently MTSS Specialist in Canyons District Responsive Services, reassigned as assistant principal at Midvale Elementary School, replacing Matt Watts.
SPECIAL EDUCATION APPOINTMENT
  • David Briggs, currently a school psychologist at Laramie County School District No. 1 in Cheyenne, Wyo., hired as a Special Education Program Administrator, replacing Stacy Kurtzhals, who was reassigned as the Elementary Support Administrator.
Did you know that half of all Canyons District’s teachers have a master’s degree? CSD is committed to hiring the best teachers for our classrooms and providing them the resources they need to excel.

There is an instructional coach and education technology specialist assigned to every one of our schools. And, in addition to offering nearly 100 hours of free training annually, we help sponsor advanced degrees for educators looking to branch into high-needs areas. Just last week, CSD celebrated its first cohort of 10 teachers to earn a master’s degree with an ESL endorsement.

Demand for educators who are specially trained to teach students for whom English is a second, or third, language is growing, says Karen Sterling, CSD’s Director of Student Advocacy and Access. When Canyons District first opened itIMG_0195.jpegs doors in 2009, the district served 1,400 English language learners. “They were a silent minority, and now they are among the fastest growing group of students, numbering about 2,700 and speaking 89 different languages,” Sterling says.

Congratulations to our teacher-graduates — professionals who are willing to do whatever it takes to champion all children.

Todd Butler, Canyons Technical Education Center
Brandie Dyson, Bellview Elementary
Hanna Turpin, East Midvale Elementary
Katherine Willie, East Midvale Elementary
Nicole Kratzer, East Midvale Elementary
Jessica Maughan, Willow Springs Elementary
Sara Hawker, Ridgecrest Elementary
Paige Irwin, Hillcrest High (former)
Stephany Gonzalez, Silver Mesa Elementary
Noelia Ricks, Draper Elementary
High school graduation is a rite of passage, a time for celebrating academic achievement, and an opportunity to spotlight our exceptional students and faculty. It’s one of those can’t-miss events, so mark your calendars now!

The District’s five traditional high schools will all perform commencement rites on Tuesday, June 5.

Ceremonies for special programs and schools are held on separate dates in May and June. Following are the dates, locations and times:

  • Alta High School — June 5, 10 a.m., Huntsman Center at University of Utah
  • Brighton High School — June 5, 2 p.m., Maverik Center
  • Corner Canyon High — June 5, 2 p.m., Huntsman Center at University of Utah
  • Hillcrest High School — June 5, 10 a.m., Maverik Center
  • Jordan High School — June 5, 6 p.m., Maverik Center
  • Diamond Ridge — June 6, 7 p.m., Mt. Jordan Middle
  • South Park School — May 31, 8 a.m. at Utah State Prison 
  • Entrada — June 26, 7 p.m., Jordan High School
  • Jordan Valley School — June 1, 11 a.m., Jordan Valley School
  • Canyons Transitions Academy — June 6, noon, Professional Development Center in CSD’s East Administration Building
It was a big night for arts education. Three talented Canyons District artists walked away winners from the 2018 Sterling Scholar Awards, an academic excellence contest sponsored by the Deseret News and KSL Broadcast Group.

Brighton High’s Sofia Rahaniotis was named Utah’s Sterling Scholar in the Speech, Theatre and Arts category, Alta High’s Addie Wray won the Vocal Performance category, and Hillcrest High’s Kara Komarnitsky won in Dance. They were joined on the podium by two Hillcrest Huskies who were named runners-up in the academic-excellence program: Sterling Larson in the World Languages category and Alex Sun in Science.

Rahaniotis, Ray and Komarnitsky were among 11 CSD students to be named finalists in Utah's Sterling Scholar competition, which honors students “for the pursuit of excellence in scholarship, leadership and citizenship.”  They each received $2,500 scholarships, and runners-up received $1,000 scholarships.

A member of the Brighton’s nationally-recognized Model United Nations team, Rahaniotis was previously awarded Brigham Young University’s Model United Nations Distinguished Delegation Award and Peer Award. She has a 4.0 grade point average, ranks first in her class, and is senior class President. She has volunteered for the Road Home homeless shelter, the American Red Cross, the Tyler Robinson Foundation, and many other charities. “To learn from, teach and inspire through art for which I feel such indescribable passion is to me the pinnacle of happiness,” she says. “I’m among those who are fortunate enough to experience such unmatched artistic joy and for this, I am truly thankful.”

Komarnitsky has performed for Salt Lake’s Repertory Dance Theatre and has been the President of Hillcrest’s dance company for three years. She spent more than 50 hours with the Washington State Trails Association rebuilding a handicap access trail, she tutors students in biology and French and holds a black belt in taekwondo. “Challenge is the method to reach future growth,” she says, “and dance challenges me to grow in different ways every day.”

Alta’s Addie Wray has played the leading role in three musicals. By age 11, she had performed in two professional shows. She has donated her time to support programs for people with special needs and says, “Vocal performing is something I was born to do, that I live, love and breathe eternally.”
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