It may be summer break, but student athletes at Brighton, Hillcrest and Corner Canyon won’t be going very far. Neither will their brand-new basketball and soccer coaches — each one has summer plans for their respective teams.

Coach Garrett Wilson became Brighton’s new head boys’ basketball coach this spring after leading high school teams for 12 years. Wilson has a Master's degree in Exercise Science and Health Promotion-Sports Psychology, a Bachelor's degree in Exercise Sports Science a minor in English teaching and a love of the game. “Oddly enough, coaching was something I always wanted to do, “ Wilson said about his career path. “Just the pace of the game is so fun. There are so many momentum swings and ups and downs.” garrett_wilson.jpg

Wilson comes from a family of coaches — including his father and brother who are coaches at other high schools — who taught him that details are important on the court. Self-control is key to success, Wilson believes. “If you want to be good at something, you have to have discipline,” he said. “You can’t cut class and think that’s not going to have some sort of indication of what you’ll do on the basketball court. Wilson’s summer plans for his team include practice, playing in tournaments and getting to know his players better.

When Kristine Jaussi took over as Hillcrest’s head coach for girl’s soccer, she already knew many of her athletes and their parents from working as an assistant coach with the boys’ team for three years. She started playing soccer when she was little and carried on through high school, where she played at Brighton High for four years.

Jaussi graduated from Brigham Young kristine_jaussi.pngUniversity and started coaching her first year of teaching in 2010. She loves the excitement of the game and the life lessons that come from the field. “You learn that the game of soccer is all about mistakes, and the winner at the end of the game is which team makes the least mistakes,” Jaussi said. “When you can really get down and play, there’s a real beauty in the game of soccer.

Jaussi’s goal is to be united with her fellow coaches. She is looking forward to summer practices and soccer camp at Southern Utah University to bond with the team. Conditioning begins on July 12, then tryouts to be one of the team’s 45 players are on August 1.

Some of Corner Canyon’s hoops players might recognize their new coach, Dan Lunt, from their previous encounters with Payson high school’s team. In March, Payson defeated the Chargers in a 4A first-round game.

Lunt, who was head coach at Payson for 23 years, became Corner Canyon’s head coach in May. “This is a new and excitiDAN_LUNT_Photo.jpgng experience in a lot of ways in that it’s going to get me out of my comfort zone,” Lunt said as he started meeting with his new team before the end of the school year. Off the field, Lunt will be teaching cabinetry and physical education classes.

The storied coach expects a strong work ethic and commitment from his players — in return, he is prepared to help the team succeed. “One of my main goals is to prepare young men for life,” Lunt said. “I think you do that and teach them how to work hard, and everything else will take care of itself. By that I mean, competing for state championship, competing to be the top of your game, if you’re prepared for life, all of those other things will fall into place.”
Note: Recordings and documents for agenda items can be accessed via BoardDocs by clicking the corresponding agenda items.


Canyons District, U. Forge Innovative Partnership


The Canyons Board of Education embraced a first-of-its-kind partnership with the University of Utah that will give flight to the higher-education aspirations of stellar students attending Alta High School. A Memo of Understanding between CSD and the U. was approved during the Board of Education’s business meeting. The alliance is the U.’s second academic, early-college partnership with a secondary school. However, it is the tier-one, PAC 12 research institution’s first official collaboration with a traditional, comprehensive public high school. The Canyons program — called Step2theU — will grant a select cohort of Alta-enrolled students the opportunity to study with U. professors and instructors at the U.’s Sandy Campus. Alta’s administration aims to open the first competitive application process in the coming months. Those selected would need to be prepared to start in summer 2017. Hawks seeking to become Utes through the program will submit applications during the fall of their junior years. If accepted, the students will be introduced to Step2theU during a summer-block program. Coursework would begin between the students’ junior and senior years, and provide an opportunity for students to finish one semester of college. Then, in the summer months after high school graduation and before the start of their freshman years, the students would take enough general-education coursework to complete another semester. In essence, by the time the Alta students reach their first day of school at the U., they would have two complete semesters completed. By participating, Alta Principal Brian McGill says, Alta students could expect to save $8,000 to $10,000 in tuition, fees and other associated college costs. The first-ever cohort would be made up of 30-35 students. The target audience of students would include current Alta students who have solid grade-point averages, as well as involvement in AP and concurrent enrollment. However, the students who submit applications will be asked to detail their engagement in school extracurriculars, demonstrate leadership and personal engagement with the community, and declare a preference in continuing their studies at the U. In addition, McGill said, the program would be heavily marketed to first-generation, minority, and low-income students. The program is expected to cost the District $70,000 per year. 

Budget Hearing

Fiscal Year 2017 will be the seventh consecutive year without a property tax increase in the Canyons District. Following a public hearing, the Board unanimously approved a financial plan for Canyons District for fiscal year 2016-2017. Major items in the nearly $405 million budget include:
  • A legislatively approved 3 percent increase in per pupil spending.
  • Negotiated contracts with teachers, staff and administrators, which include cost-of-living pay increases and cover a rise in heath insurance premiums.
  • A Board-approved effort to bolster the achievement of the schools in the Hillcrest High feeder system. The pilot initiative will put into place a method for tracking and transitioning Midvale-area students from one school to the next, as well as start an intensive summer-school program to help address the academic needs of struggling teen students.
  • A first-of-its-kind partnership with the University of Utah that will give flight to higher-education aspirations of students attending Alta High School. The program — called Step2theU — will grant a select co-hort of Alta-enrolled students the opportunity to study with University of Utah professors and instructors at the U.’s Sandy Campus and earn college credit while still in high school.
  • More money for school supplies and utilities.
  • Money to keep class sizes at current levels.
The Board also unanimously approved a revised budget for fiscal year 2015-2016, which accounts for higher-than-expected property tax collections; budget carryovers from 2014-2015; the purchase of elementary math textbooks; elementary office remodels for security; and completion of the new Mount Jordan Middle School.

“Prosperity 20/20” Presents Referendum Idea for School Funding

The Board of Education heard a presentation by Rich Kendell from “Prosperity 20/20,” a business-led movement that acts to forward education innovation, especially in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). The organization proposes to allow Utah residents to vote on whether we increase taxes 7/8ths of one percent to bolster Utah public education. He said the money would be earmarked only for education and would be run through local school boards.  Kendell gave information to the Board detailing how much each CSD school would receive if such a referendum were approved by Utah residents. 

Board OK’s Resolution Thanking CSD Legislators

The Board of Education approved a resolution thanking the members of the Utah Senate and House of Representatives for their service during the 2016 General Session of the Utah Legislature. In the resolution, the Board thanked the lawmakers for their responsiveness to the needs of the District, such as a reasonable cost-of-living-adjustment for employees; ongoing benefit, retirements and salary commitments; resources for a program to bolster academic achievement in the Hillcrest feeder system; and summer education activities for The Road Home in Midvale The Board also thanked Utah Speaker Greg Hughes for recognizing the cooperative relationships between the legislature and CSD. Specifically, the resolution named Senate President Wayne Niederhauser and Speaker Hughes; Sens. Brian Shiozowa and Howard Stephenson; and Reps. Steve Eliason, Bruce Cutler, Marie Poulson, Robert Spendlove and LaVar Christensen.

Proposed Changes to Parent School Support Group Policy

Proposed minor procedural changes to a policy that was created in 2015 to govern parent school support associations were presented to the Board for consideration. The changes to the Parent School Support Association/Organization came about after receiving feedback from the public. The changes would allow for a school community election to determine the designated parent-support group every five years. The group that seeks to be the official parent group also would need to submit to the District a notice of intent and application before Oct. 1 of the school year. In addition, according to the proposed changes, school employees who want to receive information regarding a parent school-support group would need to express the interest in writing to the Superintendent or designee.  The proposed changes also would give 30 days from the day the Board gives a notice of approval and verification for the group to file a petition for election. A community meeting also would be held to allow for all parents to hear from both the current official parent-support group and the petitioners. The Board will consider the proposed changes at a future meeting. 

Homeless-Student Summer Program

The Board of Education heard a report from Student Advocacy and Access Director Karen Sterling about summer programming for children who are finding housing at The Road Home homeless shelter in Midvale. Several dozen children whose families now use the Midvale shelter recently began receiving educational services after the Utah State Board of Education approved a one-time request to fund the program through July 1. The State Board unanimously approved allocating $15,000, money that comes from Federal Mineral Lease revenue in the State Board’s discretionary account and at the request of legislators who earlier this year funded a portion of the summer program. Together with a private $10,000 donation, the allocation will secure the program throughout June. It is anticipated that federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) dollars will be available on July 1. Until this year, The Road Home in Midvale has been open from November through March. Students there were, and will continue to be, welcomed to neighborhood schools in the Canyons District or transported back to their school of origin during the regular school year. Over the past few years, the shelter has been reconstructed and will now operate year-round. The educational program will run from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and include meals, academic instruction from Canyons certified teachers, field trips, and other activities. The Midvale Boys and Girls Club has partnered with Canyons in providing services.

Commencement Discussion

The Board of Education discussed the various commencement rites they attended.  Board member commented on positive parts of the events, such as touching student speeches, and challenges, such as sound systems that didn’t work well. In all, 2,540 students received CSD diplomas this year. Sixty-two percent received the unique-to-CSD Advanced or Honors Diplomas, which signify the students went above and beyond the state requirements for graduation.

Consent Agenda

The Board approved the consent agenda, including purchasing bids; student overnight travel; hire and terminations; May financial reports; 2016-2017 Board meeting dates; and a resolution of appreciation to area legislators. 

Adoption of High School Earth Science Textbook

The Board asked the Administration to seek input from the public on a high school Earth Science textbook that is up for adoption. The public review process will last two weeks. The textbook was recommended by a review committee made up of CSD secondary-school teachers. Board members said they wanted more time to review the book and receive public comment. The text that committee members selected is Pearson’s 14th edition of “Earth Science,” by Tarbuck and Lutgens. The teachers said the book aligns with the Utah State Earth Science Standards and contains an appropriate level of rigor and descriptions and diagrams of Earth processes that are easy to understand. The book also has QR codes that take students directly to short video lessons. There also is a Spanish version of the text. 

Sandy City Redevelopment Proposal



The Board listened to a presentation about proposed inter-local agreements to approve CDAs for a downtown Sandy project. The Board decided to continue the discussion at another meeting.

Decision Regarding Termination Appeal 

The Board decided to hear additional testimony regarding an appeal of an employee termination. According to policy, that testimony will come at a future Board meeting, as determined by the Board of Education’s leadership team. 

Patron Comments

Patron Steve VanMaren urged the Board members to post commencement addresses online so those who didn’t attend could read what was said during the rites. 

Superintendent, Business Administrator Reports

Superintendent Briscoe thanked Business Administrator Leon Wilcox for his work on the budget.  He also expressed appreciation for Assistant Superintendent Dr. Bob Dowdle and Principal Brian McGill, the two CSD administrators spearheading the partnerships with the University of Utah.  He also lauded Denise Haycock for her work as the new assistant to the Superintendent, CFO and the Board.

Wilcox said the Board would continue to receive updates on facility projects in the District. He also wished Tyler Toone, the CSD’s web master for the past seven years, much luck as he moves to another professional opportunity. 

Board Member Reports

Mr. Chad Iverson asked the Board to discuss CTESS during the upcoming Board retreat. He also urged the Board to discuss how the District can continue to drive academic achievement. Mr. Iverson also said Lagoon Day is an important tradition in CSD for students to have fun together as they leave middle school for high school.

Mrs. Clareen Arnold thanked Mr. Wilcox for explaining the budget in a simple way. She also thanked those who worked hard to make commencement special for the students, parents and teachers. She told Board leadership she’d like to review the evaluation systems, and examine how we retain our teachers. She also would like the District to look at how free time and play time can help students not be so stressed after working hard in a subject for an hour.  She also said the Board should discuss how the District could focus on guiding students toward careers in the arts.

Mr. Steve Wrigley reported on being part of the audit committee. He is looking forward to the upcoming Board retreat. He asked the Board to focus not only college- and career-readiness but readiness for the rigors of life.

Mrs. Nancy Tingey asked the Board, in its upcoming retreat, to discuss values, indicators and targets. Key performance indicators also are topics the Board may do well to discuss, she said.  Tingey also said USBA is hosting a seminar at the Little America in downtown Salt Lake City with national experts on the Every Student Succeeds Act, the reauthorization on the No Child Left Behind Act. Board members and the Administration are invited to attend. 

Mrs. Amber Shill said she’d like to talk about a grading policy in the District. At the retreat, she’d also like to discuss building a vision statement and goals, and increasing student achievement.

Mr. Robert Green visited Midvale Middle’s construction site. He also urged other Board members to take a tour of the still-under-construction school. Green also said the Board should revisit the topic of gifted and talented services in the District. 

Mr. Sherril H. Taylor congratulated the Class of 2016, their parents, teachers, and the administrators who helped oversee the schools during the year. He’d like a timeline for when information is submitted to the Board for consideration.

The Canyons Board of Education seeks public feedback on an Earth Systems textbook that is being considered for use in Canyons District high schools.

Copies of the textbook, Pearson’s 14th edition of “Earth Science,” by Tarbuck and Lutgens, will be available for review at the Canyons Administration Building-East, 9361 S. 300 East, and Canyons Administration Building-West, 9150 S. 500 West, until Thursday, June 30.

The public is invited to review copies of the textbook during business hours, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Questions about or comments on the book, which was recommended for adoption by a committee of CSD secondary-school teachers, can be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." target="_blank">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

All feedback will be shared with the Board of Education, the Administration, and the district’s curriculum specialists.
Prepare to soar toward a brilliant future, Hawks.

The Canyons Board of Education on Tuesday, June 14, 2016 embraced a first-of-its-kind partnership with the University of Utah that will give flight to the higher-education aspirations of stellar students attending Alta High School.

A Memo of Understanding between the first new school district to be created in Utah in a century and the Utah’s flagship institution of the state System of Higher Education was approved during the Board of Education’s business meeting at the Canyons Administration Building-East, 9361 S. 300 East.

The alliance is the U.’s second academic, early-college partnership with a secondary school. However, it is the tier-one, PAC 12 research institution’s first official collaboration with a traditional, comprehensive public high school.

The Canyons program — called Step2theU — will grant a select cohort of Alta-enrolled students the opportunity to study with University of Utah professors and instructors at the U.’s Sandy Campus. Alta’s administration aims to open the first competitive application process in the coming months. Those selected would need to be prepared to start in summer 2017.

"The Canyons Board of Education is pleased to provide this innovative program to the students of Alta High,” said Board President Sherril H. Taylor. “We’re honored to forge an early-college partnership with such a prestigious university, and we’re thrilled that our students will be given a chance to get a jump-start on their pursuit of post-secondary education. It also serves as just one more reason that we will continue to focus, even with our youngest students, on the importance of being college- and career-ready.”

Hawks seeking to become Utes through the program will submit applications during the fall of their junior years. If accepted, the students will be introduced to Step2theU during a summer-block program. Coursework would begin between the students’ junior and senior years, and provide an opportunity for students to finish one semester of college. Then, in the summer months after high school graduation and before the start of their freshman years, the students would take enough general-education coursework to complete another semester.

In essence, by the time the Alta students reach their first day of school at the U., they would have two complete semesters under their belts.

“This new partnership with Alta High will allow us to put everything we know about student success into a state-of-the-art, early-college experience,” said Ann Darling, Assistant Vice President of Undergraduate Studies. “We are excited to work with the great administration and staff at Alta High and Canyons School District and to serve their terrific students in their pathway to college.”

By participating, Principal Brian McGill says, Alta students could possibly save up to $10,000 in tuition, fees and other associated college costs.

The first-ever cohort would be made up of 30-35 students. The target audience of students would include current Alta students who have solid grade-point averages, as well as involvement in Advanced Placement and concurrent enrollment classes. However, the students who submit applications will be asked to detail their engagement in school extracurriculars, demonstrate leadership and personal engagement with the community, and declare a preference in continuing their studies at the U.

In addition, McGill said, the program would be heavily marketed to first-generation, minority, and low-income students.

“Canyons District’s mission is to help foster a culture of college- and career-readiness, and this innovative partnership is a way to further fulfill our commitment to our students and the families that are able to participate in this unique academic venture,” said McGill. “We have a vision at Alta High School to be the first comprehensive high school in Utah to create a new hybrid high school framework that embodies the traditional offerings in academics, arts, athletics, and extracurricular activities, combined with a this newly established early college pathway, in partnership with the University of Utah.”

The Human Resources Team would like to thank you for expressing interest in employment with Canyons School District.

We have changed to a new application system effective May 15, 2016.  If you have applied with us in the past you will have to reapply to any position you are interested in for consideration to be hired.  We have cleaned out all prior applications and will only accept applications through the new online portal.  If you need assistance with your application please feel free to come into our offices for assistance.

We're located at 9361 South 300 East, Sandy, UT 84070 (MAP)

Hours of operation: 7:30am - 5:00pm
Substitute Office Hours: 6:00am - 3:00pm
Phone 801-826-5500
Fingerprinting hours: 8:30am - 4:30pm

Please click HERE to see the Human Resources webpage. We will only accept Applications for posted positions.

Canyons School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer

If you are a current employee your login to the system will be your Canyons School District Skyward or e-mail login and password.

To view current job postings please click the button below.

Jobs ESP
The country’s best teen orators are in Salt Lake this summer vying for national titles in debate and public speaking.

Held annually since 1931, the National Speech and Debate Tournament is the largest academic contest in the nation with more than 3,300 high school students and hundreds of middle school students competing. It runs all week — June 12-17 — and is being hosted this year by Canyons School District, which is staging prelims and elimination rounds at several of its schools.

To qualify, students had to ply their rhetorical skills at district- and state-level contests. “These are some of the best and brightest in the country” — young people for whom texting, Tweeting and Facebook aren’t the only forms of communication, said Richard Fujimoto, a teacher who is fielding three students from St. Ignatius in Cleveland, OH. debate.jpg

Extemporaneous speaking, humorous interpretation, and policy debates are a few of the categories in which students compete. Also, new this year are: “Program Oral Interpretation,” which is a bit like performance art; and “Informative Speaking,” which is the only category where it’s OK to use props. 

Asked what motivated her to spend a week of her summer in a business suit, preparing for the equivalent of a major board presentation, Samantha Millison of Ohio said, “It’s fun.” Before taking speech at school, the 17-year-old says she was reserved and quiet. “Speech is kind of like family. It brings people together who wouldn’t necessarily be friends,” she says.

Learning how to frame an argument and capture an audience’s interest also are useful professional skills, says My’Kell McGee who plans to study political science at Indiana University, Purdue University Indianapolis.

CSD Instructional Support Specialist Leslie Robinett, says hosting the tournament is a coup for the district that’s enabling middle school-age students, who are too young to travel, to compete for the first time.

Preliminary rounds happen Monday and Tuesday with semi-finals later in the week and final match-ups on Friday at the Salt Palace Convention Center. A full schedule can be found online.

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  • Starting this week, all Canyons District parents will be able to access their students’ SAGE test results online. Results will be posted June 16, 2016 to the same Skyward Family Access accounts used for annual online registration. This will ensure that the information is kept secure while making it more immediately accessible to families now that school is out for the summer.


    To access your Skyward account:

    o   Visit http://www.canyonsdistrict.org.

    o   Click on the Skyward link on the menu located on the right side of the screen. 

    o   Choose the Family Access tab on the top left of the new window.

    o   Use your guardian or student username and password to log in to Skyward Family Access.

    o   Click on the “Portfolio” tab to view your child's SAGE results and your child’s report card.


    Need help with Skyward Family Access? Here's a tutorial

    Five CSD schools — Midvale Middle School and Sandy, Copperview, East Midvale, and Midvale elementary schools — have opted to provide parents with paper copies of their children’s SAGE test results. Paper-copy results will be mailed to parents on June 16, the same day they are posted to Skyward Family Access.

    SAGE (Student Assessment of Growth and Excellence) is a state-mandated, computer adaptive year-end assessment designed to measure student progress against Utah’s educational standards. Information about the test and how to interpret results can be found here.  Should you have further questions, please ask your school leaders or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    Answer:   Enjoy your summer break!  We will welcome students back on Wednesday, Aug. 24.  Kindergarten students arrive on Aug. 29.  
    “On the death of a friend, we should consider that the fates through confidence have devolved on us the task of a double living, that we have henceforth to fulfill the promise of our friend's life also, in our own, to the world.” — Henry David Thoreau

    Two Canyons District students have been awarded the first-ever Paul S. Kirby Memorial Scholarships.

    Hillcrest’s Rosa Cortez and Brighton’s Fiona Bryn VanLeeuwen were selected this year as the recipients of the $1,000 scholarships that were established in the longtime and beloved administrator’s name after his sudden passing on April 17, 2015. 

    Each year, scholarships in Dr. Kirby’s name will be given to one Hillcrest student who has learned English as a second language while pursuing and education. The Brighton scholarship is for a student who is a standout in music, especially those who play in bands. 

    The schools forward names of qualifying students to Kirby’s family for a final selection

    Dr. Kirby was known during his tenure as an educator for his dedication to excellence and positive approaches to student behavior. 

    Dr. Kirby started working as an educator in 1993, when he was hired as a Spanish teacher at Treasure Mountain Middle School in Park City and Rowland Hall-St. Mark’s School in Salt Lake City. He joined the Judge Memorial faculty as a Spanish teacher in 1994 and moved to Copper Hills High School in 1995 where he also assumed the role as Foreign Languages Department Chair. In 1999, he became the Assistant Principal at West Jordan High, and was transferred a year later to Brighton High. He was an ardent supporter of the Bengals for 10 years before beginning his assignment in 2010 as an Assistant Principal of Hillcrest High. Dr. Kirby, who also has worked as an adjunct Spanish instructor at Utah State University and Salt Lake Community College, embraced his new role as one of the Huskies’ biggest cheerleaders and bridge-builder to the Hispanic community that surrounds the Midvale-area school.

    Dr. Kirby was a well-known and respected scholar in foreign-language instruction and Spanish language and literature. He studied Spanish and medieval literature at the Universidad de Salamanca in Spain, earned his first of two master’s degrees in Spanish Language and Medieval Literature from the University of Utah, and in 2012, as he received his Ph.D. from Utah State University, he was lauded for the high quality of the qualitative research in his doctoral dissertation, “Research into the Utility of Standards in Foreign Language Instruction.”

    Want to contribute to the Dr. Paul S. Kirby Memorial Scholarship fund?  The Canyons Education Foundation continues to accept donations to these scholarships.