Regardless of whether you’re a beginning ‘boarder or Bode Miller, join us on the Best Snow on Earth at a trio of Canyons District Nights at Brighton Resort.

For six years, the ski resort has partnered with us on “Ski n’ Shred” nights for the CSD community.  Everyone in the CSD community is invited. Lift passes are $25 for those who bring a coupon found here on the website. Three dollars of each ticket sold with the coupons will go to the Canyons Education Foundation.

The dates are:
  • Saturday, Jan. 17
  • Saturday, Feb. 21
  • Saturday, March 21

Questions? Call the CSD Office of Partnerships and Community Service at 801-826-5115.

A decorated music educator at Corner Canyon High School has received a top award from the Utah High School Activities Association: The Distinguished Service Award for Music Educator of the Year.

Dr. Clark's fame as a performance musician is eclipsed only by his reputation among Corner Canyon students and fellow teachers as a highly respected educator and performer. He has taught students jazz, wind symphony, band, Advanced Placement Music Theory, percussion, and orchestra since 1999, and is Utah's sole music director to earn Superior ratings in Orchestra, Band, and Jazz 12 years in a row. He started the Utah Wind Symphony's Youth Ensemble. He serves on the Utah Wind Symphony Board of Directors, for which he supervises youth programs; as the State Band Festival Chair; and as Chairman of the Band and Jazz committees for the Utah Music Educators Association. Dr. Clark also composed the Corner Canyon school song in the school's inaugural academic year, 2013-2014.

A revered saxophone performer, Dr. Clark works as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in Jazz Saxophone at the University of Utah and has played with Gordon Goodwin, Allen Vizzutti, and Earth, Wind and Fire. In spring 2014, Clark was honored with Sorenson Legacy Award for Excellence in Secondary Music-Instrumental.
sage-photoSAGE Results: Info For Families
In spring 2014, the State Board of Education required all Utah students, beginning in the third grade, to take new state tests. The tests, called SAGE (Student Assessment of Growth and Excellence), were designed to measure more challenging state standards in mathematics, English language arts, and science. SAGE tests also are computer-adaptive, and are designed to measure students’ higher-order thinking skills. By comparison, the CRTs measured old standards and student recall via multiple choice answer sheets. Therefore, SAGE and CRT results cannot be compared.   >>SAGE Info



state-paceSchool Grading and PACE Reports
The Utah State Office of Education on Monday, Dec. 15, 2014 released two Utah school accountability reports: School Grading, and PACE. PACE is Gov. Gary Herbert's plan to ensure Utah is on pace to have 66 percent of all working-age Utahns hold a post-secondary degree or certification by the year 2020. This plan involves performance goals for kindergartners all the way through college students. School Grading was implemented fall 2013 as part of a new state law.

There is considerable overlap between the PACE accountability report and School Grading. The key differences largely revolve around how many points students and schools can earn for growth in academic achievement and college-readiness measures. PACE reports show how well students are doing on the Utah Core Standards in multiple ways. School Grading is intended to simplify the multiple measures into a single letter grade.   >>State Testing & Accountability
The 2014 Utah School Grading reports show that  83 percent of CSD schools have earned A or B grades – up from 60 percent last year.

“We are proud of the teachers and principals in Canyons School District, and the work that they’ve done in the past five years to better prepare students for college and career,” said Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe. “We celebrate improvements in student achievement on the School Grading reports, but know we have work to do to make sure all students become proficient in core subjects so they can be well prepared for the future.”

The Utah State Office of Education on Monday, Dec. 15, released two Utah school accountability reports: School Grading, and PACE, which is new this year. PACE is Gov. Gary Herbert's plan to ensure Utah is on pace to have 66 percent of all working-age Utahns hold a post-secondary degree or certification by the year 2020. This plan involves performance goals for kindergartners all the way through college students. School Grading was implemented last school year as part of a new state law.

There is considerable overlap between the PACE accountability report and School Grading.  The key differences largely revolve around how many points students and schools can earn for growth in academic achievement and college-readiness measures.  PACE reports show how well students are doing on the Utah Core Standards in multiple ways. School Grading is intended to simplify the multiple measures into a single letter grade.

Here’s a look at what each report includes:

What's Included in PACE and School Grading?



 

PACE

(Formerly UCAS)

School Grading

Academic Achievement

For both reports, academic achievement is measured using SAGE data. SAGE is administered to students in the following grades and subjects: English Language Arts, grades 3-11; Math, grades 3-11; Science, grades 4-8; and biology, chemistry, and physics in high school.

College-Readiness: Graduation Rate

For both reports, the graduation rate is used as a high school indicator of College Readiness (4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate).

Students

Students need to have 160 days of school membership to be included in Achievement and Growth.  Additionally, a school must test at least 95% of their students.

Growth Calculations

To account for year-to-year student growth, a Student Growth Percentile (SGP) is calculated for each student by the Utah State Office of Education.  This requires two steps:

1.     Establish peer groups of students who performed comparably on an initial assessment (the 2013 CRT);

2.     Compare the growth of students within those peer groups using the second assessment, 2014 SAGE.

In this way, the growth of initially low performing students is compared only with other low performing students; the growth of initially medium performing students is compared with other medium performing students; and the growth of initially high performing students is compared with other high performing students.

Every student with two years of testing has a Student Growth Percentile.

All Student Growth

School or subject area growth is calculated by taking the Median SGP of all students.  The higher the median, the more points earned by the school.

A student must earn a growth percentile (SGP) of 40 or higher to achieve Sufficient Growth and attain growth points for the school.

Below-Proficient Student Growth

Same as All Student Growth but only includes students scoring Below Proficient in the calculation.

Same as All Student Growth but only includes students scoring Below Proficient in the calculation.

Writing Achievement

The Direct Writing Assessment (DWA) was administered for the last time in the 2013-14 academic year to 3rd and 5th grade students.  Percent proficient is included on the report.

Not included on the report.

College Readiness:  ACT Scores

Reports the percent of students who earn a composite score of 18 or higher.

Reports the percent of students who score at the proficiency lever or higher for all four College Readiness Benchmarks (i.e. math, reading, English, science).

Academic

Outcomes

Reports multiple data points and comparisons. The first page includes well-labeled graphs and tables, the second lists points earned by the school in key areas, and the third page includes data for federal accountability reports.

This report factors to a single letter grade (i.e. A, B, C, D or F).



 



Utah public schools aren’t the only ones receiving PACE reports this year. For the first time, the Utah System of Higher Education will be included in state accountability reports in attempts to improve transparency.  The reports for the state colleges and universities, as well as each campus of the Utah College of Applied Technology, will include enrollment and degrees awarded, retention rates, credit loads, and tuition trends.

To view individual school grades and PACE reports, visit the Utah State Office of Education website.

What is PACE?

PACE is Governor Gary Herbert’s plan to ensure Utah is on pace to have 66 percent of all working-age Utah residents hold a post-secondary degree or certification by the year 2020.  This plan is new this year, and includes performance goals for kindergartners through college students.  There are four key aspects of PACE:
 

P – Prepare Young Learners

A – Access for All Students

C – Complete Certificates and Degrees

E – Economy Success

For public schools, the focus is on “Prepare Young Learners” and “Access for All Students.”  The Governor, the Utah State Board of Education, and other education leaders designed several metrics to measure Utah’s progress toward the 66% by 2020 goal.  The new PACE report charts the progress of schools in meeting these goals.  The measures and calculations of the previous UCAS school accountability reports are included in the PACE report. 

PACE progress is measured using existing statewide assessments. The PACE report also is used for federal accountability purposes.

What is School Grading?

In the 2013 General Session, the Utah Legislature passed the School Grading bill. This created a second accountability report for Utah.  It does not replace the new PACE report.

There is considerable overlap between Governor’s PACE accountability report and School Grading.  The key differences largely pertain to the number of points students and schools can earn for growth on academic achievement and college-readiness measures.  PACE reports present many charts and data points to illustrate how well students are doing on the Utah Core Standards. School Grading factors many data points into a single letter grade per school.

How Do PACE and School Grading Differ?

There is considerable overlap between the PACE accountability report and School Grading. Both use SAGE test data, high school graduation rates, growth calculations, and ACT scores. Key differences largely revolve around how many points schools can earn for student achievement levels and growth. PACE gives multiple data points; School Grading factors the data into a single letter grade.

Have More Challenging SAGE Tests Affected School Grading?

Yes. School grades are based largely on student achievement on SAGE (Student Assessment of Growth and Excellence) tests, which were designed to measure more challenging state standards in mathematics, English language arts, and science. The State Board of Education, following discussions with legislators, set new cut scores designed to keep a similar proportion of schools statewide in the A, B, C, D and F categories.

How is Growth Calculated?

This is a transition year for the student growth percentile (SGP) calculation.  Growth cannot be meaningfully calculated until two years of SAGE data can be collected. So for this year, the growth calculation compares like-scoring students on last year’s CRTs (for example, all third-graders scoring a 142 in Math) to students’ earned scale scores on SAGE tests (Grade 4 Math), and assigns them an SGP.

Growth is calculated differently for PACE reports and School Grading. See the table on this page for details.

Does Student Participation on Tests Affect School Grades?

Yes. If fewer than 95% of students participate in SAGE tests, the school’s grade will be lowered by one letter grade. If the participation rate is less than 95% for Below Proficient Students, the grade also will be lowered by one grade.

What Do PACE Reports Highlight?

PACE reports uphold a 90 percent proficiency goal in select subjects and grades, and highlight student achievement in the following areas:

90% proficiency in 3rd grade Reading (AIMSweb test performance)
90% proficiency in 3rd grade Math (SAGE test performance)
90% proficiency in 6rd grade Reading/Language Arts (SAGE test performance)
90% proficiency in 6rd grade Math (SAGE test performance)
90% of students reaching a composite score of 18 on the ACT (ACT test performance)
90% high school graduation rate

Does PACE Include Consequences for Schools?

There are no consequences for not meeting the PACE goals.  The public reports are meant to be readily understood by the public and add transparency to K-16 progress.

How Does School Grading and PACE Inform Parents?

Both School Grading and PACE reports help to show how well students are learning State Standards in math, language arts and science.  It is recommended that parents examine content area results to gain a more complete understanding of a school’s strengths and weaknesses.

It is important to remember that not all grades and Core Curriculum subjects are included in PACE/School Grading because not all grades and courses have a SAGE assessment. These include student performance in grades K-2, Social Studies, World Languages, Health, the Arts, and Physical Education. Additionally, high school performance is not fully represented in the reports. This is because because Math and Science SAGE results do not include all students, including those taking rigorous Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes.

How Does School Grading and PACE Inform Schools?

Canyons School District educators are encouraged to utilize accountability reports in addition to other student performance measures contained in the District’s Academic Framework to set goals for student achievement.  School leaders are encouraged to dialogue with their School Community Councils about student achievement, and communicate goals and plans to their communities.

Why Does Corner Canyon Have No Reports?

You’ll note that there is no grade and no PACE report for Corner Canyon High School. This is because both of the reports are growth-based, and state rules require two years of achievement data to calculate growth for schools. Corner Canyon High opened last school year.
Thursday, 11 December 2014 00:00

Headlines Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014

Around Canyons
Exitos! Midvale Middle program that shepherds students to success spotlighted by Univision
https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=767703729968700&set=vb.539147046157704&type=2&theater

DNews names Beetdigger QB Austin Kafentzis 5A MVP
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865617264/High-school-football-MVPs-flourished-offensively-in-2014.html

Chargers named to 4A All-State Football Team
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865617250/High-school-football-4A-all-state-teams.html?pg=all


Utah
State finds $638 million in extra funds; how much will go to education? 
http://www.sltrib.com/news/1927901-155/utah-will-have-another-638m-to

Schools statewide participating in Hour of Code
http://www.sltrib.com/news/1928556-155/riverton-teen-says-computer-programming-is

Championship-winning coach retires from Bingham football
http://www.sltrib.com/sports/1924741-155/prep-football-dave-peck-retires-as


National
Congress relaxes whole grain standards in school meals
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/765664032/Congress-relaxes-whole-grain-standards-for-schools.html


Opinion
DNews likes Utah's student data track record
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865617440/Using-data-to-track-monitor-and-improve-education-in-Utah.html
The Hour of Code is here – and CSD students are ready.

Hour of Code is a global movement supported by teachers, school districts, celebrities, President Obama, Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates – even Young Pakistani activist Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai  – aimed at exposing students to computer coding and brighter futures.

During the week of Dec. 8-12, 2014, Canyons students in several schools will spend one hour learning computer coding. At Mount Jordan and Alta High schools, activities will include every student. At Alta, students will write code for an Angry Birds-like game and for student "robots." Mount Jordan faculty have trained to help students with computer coding, and CTE teachers Melody Evans and Anthony Leavitt are challenging their students to complete all tutorials provided by the Hour of Code website.

"We are looking forward to dropping everything and coding for an hour," Mount Jordan Principal Molly Hart says.

Activities also are planned at Brighton, Jordan, Hillcrest, and Corner Canyon high schools; the Canyons Technical Education Center; Indian Hills and Union middle schools; and Sprucewood and Draper elementary schools.

"Students are having a much greater exposure (thus expertise) to computer use at a younger age. By learning how to program, it helps students become creators of technology vs. only being users of technology," CSD Career and Technical Education Director Janet Goble says. "We hope the Hour of Code will help break down barriers for students who think computer programming is only for students in high-level math courses or for boys. We want all students to feel confident that they can do it and work through problems. We encourage girls to participate in this non-threatening environment and gain the confidence that they, too, can enjoy and be good at programming."

CSD students also are exposed to computer coding outside of the global initiative Hour of Code. CSD high schools offer Exploring Computer Science and Computer Programming 1. Hillcrest and Brighton high schools also offer Computer Programming 2, and CTEC offers more advanced work to help students move from high school to the high-tech workforce.