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Canyons District is pleased to announce new leadership appointments, which were approved by the Board of Education on Tuesday, March 15, 2016. The appointments are for the coming school year. 
 
Misty Suarez, currently the Director of Student Services in Salt Lake City School District, will become the new Director of Special Education in Canyons District.  Suarez will succeed Robin Collett. Suarez has 16 years administrative experience, including six years as the principal of Mount Jordan Middle, and is licensed in special education.
 
Darrell Jensen, currently principal at Albion Middle, will become principal of Corner Canyon High, replacing Mary Bailey who is retiring. Bailey was the first-ever principal of Corner Canyon High.
 
Kelli Miller, currently an intern assistant principal at Alta High, will be reassigned as an assistant principal at Brighton High, replacing Cindy Hanson. Hanson is being promoted to principal at Mount Jordan Middle, replacing Dr. Molly Hart, who will become the principal at Albion Middle.
 
Mark Mitchell, currently an assistant principal at Hillcrest High, will be reassigned as an assistant principal at Brighton High.
 
Brenda McCann, currently an assistant principal at Brighton High, will become an assistant principal at Hillcrest High.
 
Justin Matagi, formerly an assistant principal at Alta High, will return to CSD as an assistant principal at Hillcrest, filling a vacancy on that administrative team.
 
Bruce Eschler, currently an intern assistant principal at Corner Canyon High, will become an assistant principal at Corner Canyon.
 
Edy McGee, currently an assistant principal at Indian Hills Middle, will be transferred to a temporary one-year position as an administrator on special assignment. She will assist various administrators in the District Office and gather behavioral and school-safety data, among other duties.
 
Roger Moody, currently an assistant principal at Butler Middle, will be reassigned as an assistant principal at Indian Hills Middle, replacing McGee.
 
Doug Hallenbeck, currently an assistant principal at Union Middle, will be reassigned as an assistant principal at Butler Middle, replacing Moody.
 
Taylor Hansen, currently an assistant principal at Washington Middle in the Seattle Public School District, in Seattle, Wash., will become an assistant principal at Union Middle.
 
Chanci Loran, currently principal at Copperview Elementary, will become principal of Bell View Elementary.
 
Christine Webb, currently principal at Bell View Elementary, will replace Loran as principal of Copperview Elementary.
 
Laurie Steed, currently assistant principal at East Midvale Elementary, will be reassigned as assistant principal of Sandy Elementary, replacing Diana Wallace who is resigning.
 
Angela Wilkinson, currently an administrative intern at Granger Elementary in the Granite School District, will become assistant principal of East Midvale to replace Steed.
Diamond Ridge High has fierce new logo, colors  — and a ferocious mascot to match.  

The Canyons Board of Education recently embraced the new logo, which will be used by the new alternative high school as it moves forward with its mission of providing an alternative learning environment for Canyons teenagers. 

The blue, silver, gold and black of the Diamond Ridge Raptors signify ferocity because, as Student Advocacy and Access Director Karen Sterling said, we want Diamond Ridge students to be persistent. The dinosaur also is a reminder that we want dropouts to be extinct.

The new logo, produced by the CSD Office of Public Communication, has been displayed at the school to get input from students, teachers and staff.  

Diamond Ridge is now wrapping up its inaugural year. The Board of Education last summer named the school in time for its Aug. 19 opening, the first day of school of the 2015-2016 school year. 

The first group of students at Diamond Ridge, now housed at the Canyons Technical Education Center, 825 E. 9085 South, is made up of 16- to 18-year-old students who were seeking high school diplomas at Entrada, Canyons’ adult high school.

The Board of Education in 2015 approved a proposal to open an alternative high school in Canyons District.  Until this year, CSD students who needed alternative programming left the district to attend other district’s alternative high schools or enrolled in Entrada Adult High School.  Unfortunately, the students ages 16-18 who chose to go to into the Adult Education program instead of an alternative high school were counted as “drop-outs” by the state. 

In 1976, when Draper Elementary opened mid-school year, students formed a “moving day” brigade and carried their own tote trays up the street from the old Draper Park School to the new building where the school resides today.

It’s a moment recorded in photos and now part of the 40-year-old school’s lore — and, for Head Secretary Marian Broderick, an example of the school’s close ties to the community.

In her 21 years at Draper, Broderick has seen seven principals come and go and generations of children. “Some of the kids I watched grow up are now bringing their own kids here to school,” she says. “They’ll come in and say, ‘Oh, you’re still here,’” which is kind of embarrassing, but I love it.”

Broderick remembers the “open classroom” era when there were no walls and partitions and bookcases were all that separated one class from the next. Her own children attended Draper, though back when the school was year-round.

Draper has exploded in size, and the demands upon teachers today are much different than they were 20, or even 10, years ago. But what hasn’t changed is the school’s commitment to student achievement, a responsibility that the community has always helped shoulder through donations and the tireless support of parent volunteers. “That’s what I love about my job. I get to know all these kids well and their parents,” says Broderick. “It just feels like a big family.”

On Monday, March 14, the Draper Elemenatry community came together again to commemorate the school's anniversary. Cake was served and live entertainment was provided by the school's choir. The event doubled as an art gala to showcase the collective works of Draper's students, which is appropriate considering the central role that art has played in the school's history.

Did You Know?
  • When Draper opened, the school inherited an art collection that over the years has grown to include: a Norman Rockwell original "Ichabod Crane," a piece by Utah artist Greene Richards titled, "Spring Fancies," and an untitled mountain scene by Bob Ross of PBS fame.
  • Forty years ago, Draper City's population was 5,000; today it exceeds 45,000.
  • The school cost $1.9 million to build. 
  • School staff, teachers, the PTA and students helped pack boxes in preparation for moving day.

The following slide show is a compilation of historical photos found in Draper Elementary’s archives courtesy of the PTA.

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  • It was a golden night for three Canyons District students at the 2016 Sterling Scholar Awards.

    A Hillcrest Husky and two Corner Canyon Chargers walked away big winners at the yearly academic-excellence program sponsored by the Deseret News and KSL Broadcast Group.

    Hillcrest High’s Anthony Cheng was announced as the top mathematician — and the overall general scholar — in the 54th annual competition, and Corner Canyon High’s Sadie Chidester and Camden Seeborg won in the Skilled and Technical Sciences and World Languages categories, respectively.

    Three other Canyons students also earned honors in their categories. Helen Schroder, a senior at Hillcrest High, was announced as a runner-up in English; Jared Sagae, a Corner Canyon Charger, was a runner-up in Business and Marketing; and Hillcrest’s Alexandra Palmer was a runner-up in vocal performance.

    A whopping 22 CSD students hailing from all five of the District’s traditional high schools were named as finalists in this year’s Sterling Scholar Award competition. Students vying for recognition in the contest were judged on their academic achievements as well as their leadership and service efforts.

    Awards are given in 14 categories — English, mathematics, social science, science, world languages, computer technology, skilled and technical sciences education, family and consumer sciences, business and marketing, speech/theater arts/forensics, visual arts, dance, instrumental music and vocal performance.

    More than 1,000 nominees from 80 schools participated in this year’s Sterling Scholar Awards Program. Each category winner receives a scholarship. Fifteen universities, colleges and business and technical schools also provide scholarships to winners and runners up.

    Photo courtesy Ravell Call/Deseret News

    School science fair projects are like a window to the intellect of a child.

    How does air pressure in a soccer ball affect how far it travels when kicked? Which brands of shoes have the longest-lasting soles? Do some types of wood burn faster than others?

    These are but a few of the thought-provoking questions posed by elementary school finalists in the 2015-16 Canyons District science fair. They, along with their middle and high school peers — a total of about 120 Canyons students — now advance to the regional Salt Lake Valley Science and Engineering Fair where they’ll compete against hundreds more students from surrounding districts and private schools.

    Studesciencfair3.jpgnts in grades 5 through 12 are eligible for half-a-million dollars in scholarships and cash prizes — and it’s a fiercely competitive field. Middle school projects are quite sophisticated and varied in theme, ranging from a study of the affects of elevation on air pollution to a survey of mathematic models for predicting panda populations. And by high school, poster titles such as,“FIhA: An Integral Membrane Protein Involved in Flagellar Protein Export,” are indecipherable to most lay audiences. sciencefair4.jpg

    But rest assured, the science these teens are doing is as relevant as it is sophisticated, says Instructional Supports Specialist Leslie Allen. The project cited above, conducted by Hillcrest High student Nityam Rathi— who has already published some of his work in peer-reviewed journals — examines the mechanisms of transport for proteins in cells, which could yield important clues for combatting disease.

    “Some of our students are contenders for competing at the international level and could end the season having won hundreds-of-thousands of dollars in scholarships,” Allen says.

    What: Salt Lake Valley Science and Engineering Fair
    When: March 15-17
    Where: University of Utah’s Rice Eccles Stadium.

    When You Go:
    There will be a public open house on Wednesday, March 16 from 10 to 11 a.m. for the elementary division and on Thursday, March 17 from 9 to 10 a.m. for the junior and senior divisions. The floor is closed to the public during judging.
     
    The name “Bubbles” may seem out of character for a robot programmed to lay siege on a medieval fortress.

    But it’s sure to give spectators a giggle — and possibly put Alta High’s opponents off guard at the 2016 Utah Regional FIRST Robotics Competition. “That’s why my students like it. You can’t say the name without laughing,” says Alta's Robotics Adviser Ronald Strohm.

    Four CSD high schools — Alta, Brighton, Corner Canyon and Hillcrest — will go up against 44 teams from 10 states and Canada at West Valley City’s Maverik Center March 18-19. Competition is fierce with teams flying in from as far as Florida and Hawaii. “We’d like to have someone from Utah win this thing,” Strohm says. “Utah teams have won competitions outside the state, but never on home turf.”

    Co-sponsored by the University of Utah’s College of Engineering, this fast-paced “sporting event for the mind” is the culmination of an intense design-build period for the teams. Following a worldwide unveiling of this year’s challenge in January, students had just six weeks to design, build, program and test their robots. There’s a spending cap of $4,000. And when they arrive at the Maverik Center, each robot is checked to ensure it meets weight limits and safety requirements.

    In this year’s “FIRST Stronghold” contest, alliances of robots join forces in a battle to defend their castle and breach the enemy’s by catapulting boulders, or rubber balls, at its towers. They score points by retrieving grounded balls and launching them through tower windows. During the last 20 seconds of the round, the robots surround and scale the enemy fortress to capture it.

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    Without giving away their “secret sauce,” Strohm says it would be foolhardly to underestimate Bubbles. The Alta High team has fewer years under its belt than many of its out-of-state competitors. But students are limited only by their grit and imaginations.

    If robotics competitions ignite in young people a passion for science and technology, they also expose students to other critical life skills. Each team has to write a business plan and find corporate sponsors to help pay for supplies. “Students do every bit of it. They write the grants and make the phone calls and build websites to market themselves. There’s even a group in charge of making sure the shop is safe," says Strohm. “Our rookie year, students applied for and won a $5,000 grant from NASA.”

    And all of this factors into a team’s performance; youdon’t have to win first place at the regional competition to advance the national championship held April 27 - 30 in St. Louis. Special awards for excellence in engineering or for the best rookie team at regionals also merit a trip to nationals.

    What:  The Utah Regional FIRST Robotics Competition is free and open to the public.

    Where:  Maverik Center, 3200 S. Decker Lake Dr., West Valley City

    When:  March 18-19

    If You Go:
    • Opening ceremonies: Friday and Saturday, 8:30 to 9 a.m.
    • Qualification matches: Friday, 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:45 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon.
    • Final rounds: Saturday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
    • Awards ceremonies: Friday, 5:45 to 6:15 p.m. and Saturday, 4:30 to 6 p.m.
    • Pits and machine shop: Opens Friday and Saturday at 8 a.m.


    Winter is on the wane. So it’s time to start thinking about getting into shape for swimsuit season. Canyons District’s Wellness Committee is teaming up with Sandy City to sponsor a free Community Wellness Fair from 4-6 p.m. on Thursday, March 17. The fair will be in the Canyons Administration Building-East, 9361 S. 300 East. Employees also are invited to sign up and participate in Healthy Sandy’s  “Shape Up” eight-week program that was designed to help residents lead healthier lives. Vendors who have signed up to have booths at the wellness fair include Big 5 Sporting Goods, Anytime Fitness, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Canyon Bicycles and 24 Hour Fitness.  Event organizers will be holding a raffle to give away a FitBit, Garmin Vivofit, and a Camelbak, among other items.

    pdfWellness Fair Flyer

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