bond_thank_you_ribbon-02.jpg
K-5 Standards-Based Report Cards
Friday, 17 November 2017 20:49

School Choice: Open Enrollment Starts Dec. 1

Under Utah law, students who wish to attend a school other than their neighborhood school—the one assigned to them by geographic boundaries—may apply for a transfer by submitting an Open Enrollment request.

In Canyons District, families are able to submit these forms online from the comfort of their home or office using our Online Permit Portal. For the 2018-2019 school year, the window for applying for the school-choice permits opens Friday, Dec. 1 and closes on Friday, Feb. 16. 

School transfers are approved when space is available and on a first-come, first-served basis. Paper permits are no longer available.

Once a school administrator approves a transfer permit, the permit will renew automatically every year thereafter as long as the student remains at the same school and their permit is not revoked. Permits must be renewed when a student advances from elementary to middle school or from middle school to high school.

To guide families through the process, the Department of Planning and Enrollment has created tutorials in English, Spanish, and French. Answers to frequently asked questions can be found on the Department’s website. The Main Office at your local school also is a good resource for information.
Wednesday, 15 November 2017 20:10

CSD Students Give Back for the Holidays

If Utah’s public schools are the frequent recipient of charitable giving — from booster club donations to the daily contributions of volunteers —they’re also a source of altruism. Canyons District students give back to their communities year-round, and the holidays are no different.

More than 25 Canyons District schools are sponsoring holiday donation drives this year. Despite the robust economy, intergenerational poverty continues to be a problem in Utah. To support for families in need, Canyons District schools are hosting food drives, clothing exchanges, and stuffed animal giveaways. Among the groups to benefit from their generosity are the Utah Food Bank, Sub for Santa, local animal shelters and Utah’s Ouelessebougou Alliance, to name a few.

Following a proud, four-year tradition, Canyons’ administration will be raising money and collecting winter clothing for residents of The Road Home in Midvale, a homeless shelter within the District’s boundaries. The donation drive will culminate with a luncheon featuring a performance by Jordan Valley students and a silent auction.

As part of Canyons’ partnership with the Sandy Area Chamber of Commerce, the District also is gathering gently-used purses and jewelry for People Helping People, an organization that helps low-income women, primarily single mothers, find jobs with living wages.  

How can you help? 
  • Drop off donations of winter coats, warm sleepwear and clothing (including new socks and underwear), blankets, toys, and gifts at Canyons District’s administration building (9361 S. 300 East in Sandy).
  • Donate an item to our silent auction (gift baskets, branded merchandise, gift cards) by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Checks, cash and gift cards may be given at any time to the Canyons Education Foundation and earmarked for the Gathering for Good fundraiser: 801-826-5171, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
School Holiday Fundraisers
Elementary Schools
Altara, Spring charity drive March 5-9
Bella Vista, Food drive through Nov. 11
Brookwood, January fundraiser benefitting the Ouelessebougou Alliance
Crescent, Food drive benefitting the Utah Food Bank Nov. 6-17
East Sandy, “Month of Service,” food, clothing and stuffed animal drive, Nov. 13-17.
Edgemeont, Food drive benefitting the Utah Food Bank through December.
Granite, Food drive benefitting Utah Food Bank Nov. 13 – Dec. 6
Lone Peak, Collecting money to help pay off student lunch balances, Nov 6-17.
Oakdale, Food drive benefitting the Utah Food Bank through Thanksgiving.
Park Lane, Project Teddy Bear with the Bank of American Fork, Nov. 27 – Dec. 11.
Ridgecrest, Food drive benefitting Ridgecrest and East Midvale Elementary, Nov. 6-17.
Silver Mesa, Food drive, Nov. 13-17.
Sprucewood, Food drive benefitting the Utah Food Bank, Nov. 6-20
Sunrise, Food drive benefitting the Utah Food Bank, week of Dec. 4.
Willow Canyon, Service project benefitting Midvale Elementary, food drive.
Willow Springs, Donation drive for residents of The Road Home and Ronald McDonald House.

Middle Schools           
Albion, Cereal drive, Dec. 11-16.
Butler, Clothing drive benefitting Midvale Middle store, Dec. 11-15.
Draper Park, Cereal drive benefitting CSD’s Title 1 schools.
Eastmont, Food drive benefitting the Utah Food bank.
Indian Hills, January fundraiser benefitting the Make a Wish Foundation.
Mount Jordan, Sub for Santa drive.
Union, Fundraiser benefitting local animal shelter.

High Schools
Corner Canyon, Drive benefitting the Tyler Robinson Foundation, Nov. 18-Dec.19
Jordan, Clothing and donation drive benefitting Boys and Girls Club of Sandy, Dec. 4-17.
Something has changed at Midvale Middle School.

The building itself has changed from its model built in 1955 — everything from the design of the logo to the colors of the hallways, the bright and airy library, cutting-edge cooling and heating systems, and plentiful electrical outlets. But since the new iteration of the school opened its doors this summer, Midvale Middle Principal Mindy Robison is noticing another kind of transformation that is happening in her halls.

“I think there is a motivation that is different,” Robison says. “Something about the new building has sent a message to the kids that we believe in you, and people are in awe of it. I think it sends a different message about how we value the kids. The kids really sense that.”

Midvale Middle was one of the 13 major construction projects promised to CSD patrons at the passage of a $250 million general-obligation bond in 2010. The 13th project, a renovation of Indian Hills Middle, is expected to be done in time for the first day of school this fall. At that time, plans for the the next phase of CSD’s new-school and renovation efforts, funded with proceeds from a just-approved $283 million bond, will be well underway.

Eleven major projects will be done with funds from the 2017 bond. While a priority list has not been determined by the Canyons Board of Education, contractors for rebuilds of Brighton and Hillcrest high schools and a scheduled significant remodel of Alta High were chosen by the Board of Education on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 in order to secure a price for the contractor work before construction costs escalate.  An architect for the new Union Middle was chosen, as well.  Architects for the projects at Brighton, Hillcrest and Alta had been selected Sept. 5, 2017 in accordance with state procurement guidelines and during a regularly scheduled and appropriately noticed public meeting. 

The impact of being in a new school stimulates students’ desire to come to school, Robison says, but the effect goes farther than the cool new cafeteria. Kids want to be in the building, and teachers feel excited to come to work, she says. But even members of the community who don’t have children in the school came to celebrate the school’s opening, and the ripple effect is not limited only to Midvale City.

The impact of new school buildings has been shown to increase student achievement, raise property values and contribute to local economies, according to several studies on the relationship between school construction and communities. While safety, technological accessibility and student needs drive decisions to rebuild and remodel schools, studies show that new-school construction also increases enrollment, boosts student and teacher pride and lifts property values.

“An improved or new school says to the kids, technology is part of the world in which you live,” says Midvale Mayor JoAnn Seghini, a long-time educator and advocate for students. “It says to the kids, ‘You are really important and we really care about your learning and how you are doing.’ It says you can’t stop trying, you have to keep looking at new ways of looking at the futhankyou.jpgture.”

According to a 2011 study published by the Institute of Labor Economics, an economic research institute based in Germany, school construction positively impacts student test scores, school enrollment and home prices. In the study, Yale researchers examined a poor, urban school district based in New Haven, Conn.,  as it embarked on a 15-year plan to revitalize its schools. The study found that trends in reading scores in the district trended upward in the year of construction of the new school and continued to increase for the next six years. Home values increased by 1.3 percent per $10,000 of per-student expenditure and student enrollment increased by 4.4 percent.

A 2008 study of California school districts published by the National Bureau of Economic Research found that investments in school facilities yield increases in both math and reading scores. They gauged the effects of new or renovated schools to be “about one-third as large as the effect of reducing class sizes from 22 to 15 students.”

Communities that invest in schools see immediate returns. Enrollment has increased at several new schools in Canyons District. At Mount Jordan Middle, student enrollment jumped from 732 students in 2013 to 941 in 2017, just two years after the new school was completed in 2015. Enrollment at Butler Elementary increased from 505 students in 2014 to 549 students in 2016, when the new school opened. The new Midvale Elementary grew from 738 students in 2010 to 822 students the year the school was completed in 2012, and Midvale Middle enrollment grew from 803 students in 2014 to 919 students in 2017, when the school opened.

In Cottonwood Heights, Canyons’ efforts to rebuild and remodel aging schools has revitalized the city, Mayor Kelvyn Cullimore says.  The District’s school-improvement plan is one major factor that has led to a 4 percent increase in the sale price of existing homes in the town, he says. According to the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah, Cottonwood Heights is one of just four cities in Salt Lake County that had an overall increase in the sales price of existing homes since 2007.

“It has made a huge difference in the appeal of our community,” Cullimore says, as he points to a new Butler Middle School, new Butler Elementary, new tennis courts, new football and soccer fields, improvements to Brighton High and a partnership creation of popular Mountview Park as evidence of the impact the District has had on the town. “We have a fabulous relationship with the school district and are able to have the community take ownership of and pride in the schools in our municipal boundaries.”
At the same time word started to spread about the toxic-water woes in Flint, Mich., Canyons District began stepping up efforts to ensure safe water is flowing in its schools’ drinking fountains and sinks. As a result, the District has nearly two years of records that track the quality of water being consumed by Canyons students, teachers, principals and volunteers.

“It’s a stated goal of the Canyons Board of Education and Administration to build and maintain safe and welcoming learning environments,” said Canyons Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe. “As part of our ongoing efforts to improve and modernize CSD’s learning environments, Canyons also has taken the appropriate yet entirely voluntary steps to ensure the water in our schools is safe to drink and use for food preparation.”

Canyons District was the first school district in Utah to conduct regular, scheduled water testing at all of its schools, including the new projects completed with funds from the $250 million voter-approved bond in 2010. Water testing will continue at the new and renovated schools that will be funded with proceeds from the $283 million bond measure approved by 57 percent of voters on Nov. 7, 2017. Both the measures were tax-rate-neutral. 

Here’s how the testing works: Canyons District’s Risk Management Coordinator Kevin Ray arrives at the school before 6 a.m. to get a “first draw.” Those are samples of water that are pulled before any water can be used in the building. This is so the District can get a reading of the possible contaminant levels before the pipes are flushed with new, fresh water.

With each sample bottle, Ray caps it, seals it, and takes it to an independent testing agency to be examined. After a few days, CSD learns the milligrams-per-liter levels of iron, copper and lead. If the levels exceed those allowed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the District immediately notifies parents and teachers and begins a mitigation effort, especially with high levels of lead. Traces of other minerals or metals in the water also may be a signal that the pipes need to be examined. 

“We want students and teachers to know that, through our efforts, they are going into a building that is free from any type of contaminant, be it airborne or in the water” says Ray, who also conducts regular radon-gas testing in Canyons schools. “It’s important to us that   school communities are aware that we conduct these tests and are going to great lengths make sure there is safe drinking water in the schools.

Thanks to Canyons’ water-testing program, the District was able to identify and mitigate water-quality issues at four schools. Filters were installed at Edgemont and East Midvale elementary schools to correct higher-than-the-EPA-guidelines levels of iron. Pipes and fixtures were replaced at Quail Hollow and the old Crescent View Middle when elevated levels of lead were detected.   The results of recent lead testing are posted on the CSD website.

Patrons with questions about the water-testing program can call the Canyons Administration Building-East at 801-826-5000 and ask for CSD's Office of Risk Management.

The majority of residents who cast ballots in the 2017 General Election voted in favor of the Canyons Board of Education’s proposal to use proceeds from a $283 million tax-rate-neutral bond to provide modern and safe schools to children in all parts of the District. 

Unofficial election results indicate that 57.07 percent voted in favor of the plan, which will result in the completion of 11 major construction projects. This includes total rebuilds of Hillcrest and Brighton high schools and a major renovation of Alta High. Some 42.93 percent voted against the measure. Voter turnout was 41.5 percent, according to the Salt Lake County Clerk's Office.

“We are grateful for those who studied our proposal and voted in favor of working in partnership with us to provide safe and modern schools for the children in our community,” said Board President Sherril H. Taylor. “The vote of confidence in our facility-improvement plan is very much appreciated — but we take it very seriously. As we now turn our attention to the hard work of bringing this plan to life, we also reiterate our pledge to be wise stewards of taxpayer dollars as we continue to build up Canyons together.”  

In addition to the Brighton, Hillcrest and Alta projects, the District will: 
  • Rebuild Union Middle
  • Rebuild Midvalley Elementary
  • Rebuild Peruvian Park Elementary
  • Rebuild a White City-area elementary
  • Replace portables with classrooms at Corner Canyon High
  • Build a new west Draper elementary
  • Remodel offices at Brookwood, Granite, Oakdale, Park Lane, Silver Mesa, and Sunrise elementary schools
  • Install windows and skylights for natural light at Altara, Bell View, Brookwood, Canyon View, Crescent, East Midvale, East Sandy, Granite, Lone Peak, Oakdale, Oak Hollow, Park Lane, Quail Hollow, Ridgecrest, Silver Mesa, Sprucewood, Sunrise, and Willow Springs elementary schools

Approval of the bond measure allows the District to continue addressing needs in aging schools in Cottonwood Heights, Draper, Midvale, Sandy and the town of Alta while also planning for future growth. Since 2010, when residents of Canyons District gave approval for a $250 million tax-rate-neutral bond, Canyons District has completed 12 major construction projects. The 13th project promised to the voters at the time of the 2010 bond’s passage is the renovation of Indian Hills Middle, which is expected to be complete by fall 2018.

Work on the first projects with proceeds from the 2017 bond could start this summer.

The District will keep the public updated on the progress of the projects via the website, bond.canyondistrict.org.
Page 1 of 84