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Due to unseasonably high temperatures, Jordan High School's Tuesday, June 6 commencement ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Maverik Center (3200 Decker Lake Dr., West Valley City, UT 84119).

Previously, the event was scheduled to take place at 7 p.m. at the Beetdigger's outdoor stadium. But evening temperatures are forecast to approach the nineties, and temperatures on the football field are even higher.

We recognize this is a departure from tradition, and we thank students for being so understanding. After all, we want families to comfortably and safely enjoy this can't-miss event.  
Two students at Midvale Middle are part of a group that has received the regional President’s Environmental Youth Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Trojans Abigail Slama-Catron and and Eric Snaufer, along with two others from the Beehive Science and Technology Academy, earned the prestigious award for their "Bionic Scarecrow" device, which was created with the aim of keeping birds away from nesting in the wetlands around the Salt Lake International Airport. 

Last Thursday, Acting Deputy Regional Administrator Suzanne Bohan visited the middle school to present the award to Midvale Middle's Slama-Catron and Snaufer and Timothy Holt and Allison Drennan, who previously attended Sunrise Elementary and now attend Beehive Academy. The group of sixth-graders also demonstrated the award-winning project and answered questions from other students about their research and methods.

Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe also attended the award presentation and congratulated the students on their ingenuity and dedication.

“These student winners are exemplary leaders, committed to strong environmental stewardship and problem solving,” EPA Acting Deputy Regional Administrator Suzanne Bohan said. “Environmental education cultivates our next generation of leaders by teaching them to apply creativity and innovation to the environmental challenges we face as a nation. I have no doubt that students like these will someday solve some of our most complex and important issues.”

The Environmental Youth Award recognizes outstanding environmental education and stewardship projects from sixth- through 12th-grade students. Students from all 50 states and U.S. territories submit life-changing innovative projects to the EPA for consideration.

The region includes Utah, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Wyoming. Abigail also produced a winning Canyons District Film Festival film on the project.

See the students' appearance on ABC4 "Good Morning Utah" during which they talked about the proejct.

There’s still time to apply for a spot in Canyons District’s innovative program for kindergarten-age students. 

The District continues to take applications for the Supplemental Hours of Instruction classes for the 2017-2018 school year — a groundbreaking early-childhood academic initiative that was recently spotlighted by KSL-TV Channel 5

Students in the classes receive nearly four additional hours of instruction every school day. Enrollees begin and end school at the same time as the school’s first- through fifth-grade students.  This is the second year Canyons has provided this educational opportunity to the community. 

Who is eligible for the opt-in, tuition-based program?  Any student who is 5 years old by Sept. 1, 2017.  

How to apply?  It’s easy — click here to access Frequently Asked Questions and the online application. 

Click here to see the bell schedules for all Canyons schools.

Cost for the program is $2,950 a year, and can be paid in monthly installments, August-May. A 10 percent discount is available for parents and guardians who pay the yearly tuition in full at one time. There also is a one-time, non-refundable registration fee of $100.

Financial-need scholarships also are available for qualifying students. Parents may apply for the financial assistance at the same time they submit enrollment applications. 

The program is dependent on enrollment. The program can only be offered at a school if there are at least 20 students who have signed up. 

The District aims to provide the program at Alta View, Altara, Bell View, Bella Vista, Brookwood, Butler, Crescent, Lone Peak, Midvalley, Oakdale, Park Lane, Ridgecrest, Sprucewood, Sunrise, Quail Hollow and Willow Canyon elementary schools. 

Efforts will be made to enroll students at school closest to their homes — but the District cannot guarantee placement at any specific school.  

Children who qualify for transportation services will ride the kindergarten bus with morning-session kindergarten students and will ride home with the afternoon-session kindergarten students. 

Questions?  Call 801-826-5045 or send an e-mail message to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
The first-ever members to join Alta High’s marching band will be graduating this year — and they’ll be celebrating in a big way.

After four years of high-stepping, twirling and drumming, Canyons District’s only marching band will be taking their talent across the country to represent Utah in the 13th annual National Memorial Day Parade, held annually on Constitution Avenue to honor the men and women who have served valiantly in the U.S. Armed Forces.  The parade starts at 2 p.m. Eastern on Monday. 

This is the first time the award-winning band will perform in a different state, and they will be the only Utah marching band in the event. The parade is one of the country’s largest Memorial Day event.

“I had no idea we would be marching in this parade,” said Alta bandleader Caleb Shabestari, who led the band to 2A division state championships in 2013 and 2014. “I think it’s cool we’ve doubled the size of the band in four years and we’re taking a trip across the country. We couldn’t have done that last year.”

Sandy Mayor Tom Dolan nominated the marching band to represent Utah last March and the group has been preparing ever since. These days, the students attend practice two days a week to put the final touches on their patriotic program. The songs they will perform will highlight an immigrant’s journey to the United States.

“Just for the parade we’ve probably practiced for 40 hours straight,” Shabestari said. For those who won’t be able to see the parade in Washington, D.C. on Monday, May 29, the band will perform the same numbers at parades this summer in Sandy and Draper. 

The parade also will be streamed live on military.com.  

In June, the Alta High marching band will begin rehearsals for the summer band program, which includes flashy performances in Fourth of July and city celebration parades. The students range in age from seventh- to 12th grades and hail from all parts of the District. 

In the fall, the group will start working on their fall competition program, which will feature a theme of air, flight and planes, with completely original music. Students from all over Canyons participate in the District band located at Alta.

 “My goal at the end of five years is to have a band with over 100 people,” Shabestari said. “We are well on track to do that.”
The Board of Education on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 unanimously voted to approve a negotiated agreement with the Canyons Education Association for 2017-2018 school year.

The agreement contains a small adjustment to the Conversion Placement Table approved at the April 25, 2017 meeting of the Board of Education. The new, single-lane salary schedule represents the largest pay hike in the District’s history, bumping the starting-teacher salary by more than $5,000 to $40,500, while also funding raises for mid-career and veteran educators. Every licensed employee will see no less than a 4 percent jump, significantly improving their lifetime earnings and retirement payments. It’s a big investment and tangible proof of how much the CSD community values education, says Board of Education President Sherril H. Taylor.

"We have said it before and we will say it again: Teaching is the profession that teaches all other professions," he said. "With the intention of bringing the best and brightest to Canyons District classrooms, and to give teachers a chance to earn more over the length of their careers, the Board of Education moved singularly and decisively to make an important and positive financial impact in the lives of our teachers."

CEA President Jen Buttars also said the association appreciates "the nearly $11.5 million investment in teacher salaries and believes that the Board has truly demonstrated a commitment to not only recruit, but also retain educators."

"The CEA believes that (the Board's) commitment to listening to the concerns of educators, recognizing professional judgement and attending to salary, benefit and working condition concerns, allows educators to focus on their
efficacy for the benefit of all Canyons School District students," she said.

As part of the agreement, the District will cover 83.7 percent of the 11.33 percent hike in health insurance premiums that takes effect in January 2018. One Personal Leave Day will be converted back to a Sick Leave Day. Also, under a policy change, the provisional status of experienced transfer teachers may be shortened if they have:
  • Successfully taught for at least three consecutive years in an accredited school or district
  • Completed at least one year of provisional service with Canyons District
  • Successfully met the criteria outlined in GCOA-Evaluation of Instructional Staff (Licensed)
  • Been recommended by their principal/supervisor for a Provisional Status Exception
  • Received approval by the Director of Human Resources

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