A shutterbug at Jordan High is helping Canyons District send wishes of a picture-perfect yuletide.

A photograph taken by 17-year-old Shellby Carvalho shines bright on the cover of the District’s 10th annual holiday card, which is sent to local legislators, Utah’s members of Congress, and Canyons’ major supporters. 

The star of Carvalho’s photo is her snow-white dog, Cali, a 2-year-old Great Pyrenees and Labrador mix she adopted from the Humane Society of Utah. 

“Because my dog is white, I thought that was a symbol of simplicity and purity, which is what the holiday season is all about,” says Carvalho, who takes Advanced Placement art classes and is the school’s Sterling Scholar candidate in the visual arts category.

“I’m so happy that I was able to make it happen,” she said about the photo shoot, which required stringing up colorful lights well before the holiday season and getting the dog to sit still long enough to snap the shot. She also edited the images and used a photo-enhancement program to complete the design.

Carvalho plans to major in environmental studies at Westminster College next fall.   

This is the fifth year Canyons District has asked students to create artwork for the official holiday card.  Students from Corner Canyon, Brighton, Alta and Jordan Valley School have provided artwork in previous years.
The job market faced by today’s high school graduates looks nothing like the market of five years ago, and with the pace of change in technology, there’s no telling what tomorrow will bring.

Auto makers are already testing automated driving systems that will reduce the need to hire truck drivers, and computer algorithms are being developed that could one day replace insurance underwriters, financial analysts and even radiologists.

What does career-readiness look like for students coming of age in such a rapidly-changing world? What kinds of skills and knowledge should they be acquiring, and how?  

If you asked Jamie Hyneman, co-host of the popular TV show, MythBusters, he’d say that while accessing the right training and schooling is important, the secret to securing a fulfilling career comes down to having the right attitude. “It comes down to resilience, hard work, and self-discovery. Growing up, I discovered if you’re methodical and work hard, you can do anything,” he told high school-age attendees of the 2018 Pathways to Professions Expo, a showcase of Career and Technical Education courses available at Utah’s public schools. His appearance, a question-and-answer session narrated by Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox, was sponsored by Salt Lake Community College.hynemansmall

Before he was a TV show host and special effects expert, Hyneman was a man of many trades. In his younger years, he worked as a mountain guide, cook, building inspector, and builder in addition to laboring on farms and in libraries. At first blush, his resume might appear haphazard, or the record of someone who is perpetually distracted.

But Hyneman said he approached each of these occupations like an insatiably curious “forensic scientist” bent on soaking up all the knowledge he needed to master the job. “I didn’t start with exceptional skills. I’d follow-up, and follow through. I’d get my foot in the door, pay my dues and become an asset to the company,” he said.

His advice to students: Find things that interest you, and experiment with them—preferably not with explosives until you’re ready—be methodical, and don’t be afraid of failure. “Just be methodical and work hard and it’s amazing what you can do,” he said.

This strategy certainly comes in handy when it comes to orchestrating special effects, busting myths and inventing, which is what Hyneman is doing now for the U.S. military and venture capitalist entrepreneurs. MythBusters was an enjoyable and lucrative side gig that has given him the freedom to choose how to spend his time, he says. “My life now is about going into my shop, locking the door, cranking the music and coming out with something that nobody ever dreamed of.”

Asked by a student attendee when he realized what he finally wanted to do in life, Hyneman said, “I don’t think I’m there yet.”

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  • High school graduation is a rite of passage, a time for celebrating academic achievement, and an opportunity to spotlight our exceptional students and faculty. It’s one of those can’t-miss events, so mark your calendars now!

    The District’s five traditional high schools will all perform commencement rites on Tuesday, June 5.

    Ceremonies for special programs and schools are held on separate dates in May and June. Following are the dates, locations and times:

    • Alta High School — June 5, 10 a.m., Huntsman Center at University of Utah
    • Brighton High School — June 5, 2 p.m., Maverik Center
    • Corner Canyon High — June 5, 2 p.m., Huntsman Center at University of Utah
    • Hillcrest High School — June 5, 10 a.m., Maverik Center
    • Jordan High School — June 5, 6 p.m., Maverik Center
    • Diamond Ridge — June 6, 7 p.m., Mt. Jordan Middle
    • South Park School — May 31, 8 a.m. at Utah State Prison 
    • Entrada — June 26, 7 p.m., Jordan High School
    • Jordan Valley School — June 1, 11 a.m., Jordan Valley School
    • Canyons Transitions Academy — June 6, noon, Professional Development Center in CSD’s East Administration Building
    All of CSD’s five traditional high schools — including, for the first time, Jordan High — will be fielding teams at the 2017 Regional FIRST Robotics Competition where they’ll compete against peers from seven states and Canada.

    This is the Beetdiggers’ inaugural year, and while the rookie team is not as well-funded or experienced as its rivals, students are riding a wave of “first-timer’s” excitement. Also, the team got a jump start with $6,300 in seed funding from the Canyons Education Foundation. “In past years, some of our brightest students have had to compete for neighboring teams. Now they’ve returned to be a part of our rookie season,” says the team’s adviser Cameo Lutz.

    In all, 48 teams will compete in the regional March 10-11 contest, which is sponsored by the University of Utah’s College of Engineering. The event is free and open to the public and will be held at the Maverik Center in West Valley City (3200 S. Decker Lake Drive).

    Taking cues from the Steampunk subculture, this year’s “FIRST Steamworks” competition calls for robots that are both futuristic and retro in design. Teams are in a race to launch balls (fuel cells) into a mock steam boiler with a goal of building enough fuel to operate a simulated steam-powered airship. The remote-controlled robots must also haul enough giant gears to the airships to operate the ships’ propellers.

    Each round ends as human players, who are stationed atop the airships, turn cranks to engage the gear-driven propellers and lower ropes to hoist the robots aboard.

    The two-day competition marks the culmination of a six-week design-build period where student teams engineer, program and test their bots. It’s an exercise in teamwork, which, as the "Steampunk" theme suggests, involves science, technology, engineering, art, and math (S.T.E.A.M.). The Steampunk aesthetic, a blend of science-fiction fantasy with the industrial, steam-powered 1800s, will add a special flavor to this year's competition, said U. mechanical engineering associate professor Mark Minor in a press statement. “Many teams will dress up in period costumes and give their robots a cool design."

    Special award recipients and winners of the regional competition will advance to the FIRST National Championship held April 19-22 in Houston and April 26-29 in St. Lois. Following is a schedule of events. For more information, visit: http://www.utfrc.utah.edu/

    Schedule:
    Opening ceremonies, Friday and Saturday, 8:30-9 a.m.
    Qualification matches: Friday, 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:45 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon.
    Final rounds: Saturday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
    Awards ceremonies: Friday, 5:45 to 6:15 p.m. and Saturday, 4:30 to 6 p.m.
    Pits and machine shop: Opens Friday and Saturday at 8 a.m.

    Do the winter blues have you down? Would you rather disappear into Victorian England, consider the value of individuality, laugh about society’s pitfalls, pretend you are at the Globe Theatre or spy on the Salem witch trials from the comfort of a high school auditorium? Never fear, Canyons’ students are hard at work on this year’s lineup of Winter-Spring plays — and they’re ready to transport you to your destination of choice.

    From “Hamlet” to “Urinetown,” each of Canyons’ high schools — and several middle schools — will be presenting a variety of musicals and plays beginning later this month.

    “Our goal is to create a unique version of the world’s most famous play that will cause audiences to realize they can understand Shakespeare,” says the award-winning Hillcrest d16425746_3878946570826_6174560334808074503_n.jpgrama teacher Josh Long. Hillcrest’s production will feature three different versions of Shakespeare’s original script for a streamlined performance, transported into a modern setting, with digital screens surrounding the audience.

    Long chose to present “Hamlet” as an additional challenge to his students, who are already four-time Shakespeare Competition champions and four-time State Champions.

    Here is a rundown of CSD's theatrical productions:
    • Alta: The Crucible, 7 p.m. Feb. 22-25 @ Alta auditorium
    • Jordan High: Jane Austen’s “Emma,” 7 p.m. March 2-4, 6 @ Jordan auditorium
    • Hillcrest: Hamlet, 7 p.m., March 17-18, 20 @ Hillcrest auditorium
    • Corner Canyon: Urinetown, 7 p.m. May 17-20 @ Corner Canyon auditorium
    Middle school performances: 
    • Draper Park Middle: The Lion King Jr. 7:30 p.m. March 7-11
    • Mt. Jordan Middle: Fame! Jr. 7 p.m. May 12, 16-18
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