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Canyons Board of Education, Education Association Approve 2018-2019 Contract

The Canyons Board of Education and the Canyons Education Association announced a tentative agreement regarding teacher compensation for the 2018-2019 school year. The contract, a 5.67 percent boost to CSD educator compensation, is the result of extensive good-faith negotiations between the CEA and the District Administration. The salary and benefits package provides both across-the-board salary increases and one-time bonuses, continuing Canyons District’s investment in a stated commitment to attracting and retaining highly skilled, innovative, and engaged educators. Under the contract, the District agrees to a 2.5 percent, or $1,335, cost-of-living increase in addition to advancing every teacher a $900-per-year increment level on the salary schedule. Combined, the increase to the base contract will be $2,235. Also, in November, all full-time CSD teachers will receive a $500 one-time bonus, and veteran educators with continuous service with the District prior to July 1, 1998 will receive an additional $500 one-time bonus. The District will increase its share of health-insurance premiums by 3 percent, regardless of the employee’s chosen insurance plan.  Employees on the traditional plan will see a 3 percent increase, employees on the high-deductible plan will not experience any increase. The Board of Education approved the tentative agreement in a public meeting Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Members of the Canyons Education Association are in the process of voting on the tentative agreement. The Board of Education, Administration and CEA appreciate the collaboration and dedication of all parties to reach an agreement on the contract, and look forward to its implementation.

The Board of Education also approved tentative agreements with administrators and Education Support Professionals.  The details are as follows: 

FOR ADMINISTRATORS 

• Agreement represents a 4.51 percent increase in compensation
  • The District will fund increment steps for eligible employees
  • The District will fund a 2.25 percent COLA to the base of the Administrator’s Salary Schedule
  • The District will fund a 1.25 percent one-time stipend for those administrators on the top step during the 2017-2018 school year.  There are 48 administrators who will qualify for this stipend. 
  • The District will fund a $500 one-time stipend for all administrators that will be paid on the Nov. 15 payroll date.  The stipend will be allocated on FTE status. (i.e., 1.0 FTE will receive $500; 0.5 FTE will receive $250). Administrators must be employed as of Oct. 15 to be eligible.
  • The District will increase high school principal and assistant principal activities differential stipend from 6 percent to 7 percent. Elementary principal and middle school principal stipend will increase from 0.5 percent to 1 percent.  
  • Employees on the traditional health insurance plan will have a 3 percent increase beginning January 2019.  Those on the high-deductible plan will not see an increase.

FOR EDUCATION SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS


• Agreement represents a 5.56 percent increase in compensation
  • The District will fund increment steps for eligible employees
  • The District will fund a 2.25 percent COLA to the base of the ESP Salary Schedule 
  • The District will fund a $500 one-time stipend for all ESP that will be paid on the Nov. 15 payroll date.  The stipend will be allocated on FTE status.  (i.e., 1.0 FTE will receive $500; 0.5 FTE will receive $250).  ESP must be employed as of Oct. 15 to be eligible.  Hourly ESPs will receive a $100 stipend on Nov. 15 paycheck.
  • Employees on the traditional health insurance plan will have a 3 percent increase beginning January 2019.  Those on the high-deductible plan will not see an increase.
  • The District agrees to a salary study for paraeducators, school administrative assistants, custodians, with the possible purpose of adjusting the aforementioned employees into a multi-lane salary structure. 

Legislator Addresses Board


Rep. Bruce Cutler, R-Murray, spoke to the Board about legislative matters that could impact the school District. He also updated the Board on the advancement of bills regarding early childhood development, public-education funding, and supplemental funding for Special Education teachers, among other items. The Board expressed appreciation to Cutler, also a remember of the Canyons Education Foundation, for representing the District at the legislature. 

Brighton High Rebuild

The architects and contractors for the new Brighton High project joined Business Administrator Leon Wilcox in updating the Board of Education on the rebuild of the Cottonwood Heights-area school. The new school, to be designed by MHTN and built by Hogan Construction, will be funded with proceeds from the $283 million bond voters approved in November. Demolition and construction are expected to take about three years. Preparatory work at the site will be done from now until September. In the fall, work on a Field House, Athletic Building, 1,150-seat Performing Arts Center, and Career and Technical Education shops will start. The next phase will include the main classroom building, commons, cafeteria, and the new Bengal Plaza. The final phase will include wrapping up any remaining construction and demolition at the site. Students will continue to attend school at Brighton throughout the construction. Principal Tom Sherwood said efforts are being made to secure parking during the construction period. Architect Scott Later also told the Board the new three-story Brighton will have security measures, such as “lockdown zones,” throughout the building. The most recent renderings, which show a school that is patterned after an institution of higher education, were displayed at the meeting. Board 1st Vice President Nancy Tingey thanked the design team for soliciting and listening to input from the community and faculty. Sherwood said MHTN and Hogan have been great partners with the District in creating a plan to minimize impact to the Bengal community while work is being done.
 
Future Facility Plans

Canyons District is creating plans for a “one stop-shopping” central office at 9361 S. 300 East. The pending sale of District property on 500 West in Sandy for $9.6 million will fund some renovations and the addition of a new building at 9361 S. 300 East, the site of Canyons Administration Building-East. The new building would be constructed to accommodate the departments now operating from Canyons Administration Building-West, 9150 S. 500 West. This project is designed to be cost-neutral. The sale of the land will pay for the facility, and no proceeds from the voter-approved bond will be used on the central office. The aim is to bring all departments under one roof to streamline operations and encourage even more collaboration among employees. It also will make it easier for patrons, who must go between the two central offices to obtain information and meet with staff members and administrators. 

CTE CAPS Program

Assistant Superintendent Dr. Robert Dowdle and Career and Technical Education Director Janet Goble briefed the Board on plans to expand the District’s CAPS program, or Center for Advanced Professional Studies. Canyons District’s Career and Technical Education arm has applied for a grant from the state Department of Workforce Services to help fund the center.

Budget Update

Budgeted expenditures are expected to be $272 million for the 2018-2019 Fiscal Year, according to Business Administrator Leon Wilcox, who updated the Board on Canyons’ proposed budget. He also updated the Board on the General Fund, property tax impacts, the District’s debt-service rate, projected tax rates, and capital projects. Wilcox said the proposed budget is up for adoption on June 12.  The budget must be available for inspection for 15 days before adoption.

Statement of Appreciation 

Members of the Board of Education and Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe expressed appreciation to outgoing Board secretary Denise Haycock. She is leaving the position to become the Canyons Education Foundation’s Development Officer. Flowers were presented to Haycock.

Awards and Recognitions

The Board of Education honored the following for their achievements: 

·      Sharee Jorgensen, Excellence in Arts Education, Sorensen Legacy Awards

·      Debbie Beninati, Elementary Music Instruction, Sorensen Legacy Awards

·      Hillcrest Theater team and advisers, 6A UHSAA Champions in Theater

·      Vishwa Srinivasan, Alta High student, 2018 Utah High School Chess Champion

Academic All-State Honorees

·      Boys soccer:  Brighton’s David Brog, Thatcher Schwendiman, and Jace Vance

·      Baseball:  Corner Canyon High’s Matthew Ebeling and Dalton Hagen

·      Girls Track and Field:  Hillcrest’s Maddison Hooper and Madeline Martin; Brighton’s Claudia Caten, Emily Johansen and Olivia Liu; Corner Canyon’s Nicole Critchfield, Makenzie Easton, Raili Jenkins, Hannah Sanderson and Madison Westerlind. 

·      Boys Track and Field:  Corner Canyon’s Aaron Jackson, Trevor Lawson, and Michael Petty

·      Boys Tennis:  Corner Canyon’s Trek Lewis

·      Girls Golf:  Hillcrest’s Jessica Ulrich; and Brighton High’s Mia Montgomery and Katherine Pearson

·      Softball:  Alta’s Maguire Wright and Brighton’s Erin Christesen

Patron Comment

Corner Canyon High teacher Jana White urged the Board to approve a 24-classroom addition at the high school. The planned-for wing is one of the projects that will be funded with proceeds from the voter-approved $283 million bond.

Lynda Hansen addressed the Board about the offerings provided by the Utah Parent Center. 

Karl Banks, representing the Education Support Professionals, thanked the Administration for the successful contract negotiations.

CEA President Erika Bradshaw and CEA Vice President Karen Pederson expressed appreciation for the smooth process that was followed to arrive at the tentative agreement for the 2018-2019 school year. They thanked the Board and Administration for supporting a competitive salary schedule.

Pledge and Reverence

East Sandy Elementary students led the audience in a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance and Principal Dr. Angela Wilkinson gave the reverence. Toward ensuring that all of East Sandy’s 433 students feel welcome and noticed, classrooms gather each morning to discuss how their feeling and share news of the highs and lows and of their days. The activity has contributed to a positive culture at the school where students say how proud they are to be Mustangs and teachers speak of how much they enjoy their work.

 

Consent Agenda

The Board of Education approved the Consent Agenda, including the minutes of the April 24, 2018 meeting of the Board; hire and termination reports; purchasing bids; student overnight travel; principal and assistant principal appointments for Diamond Ridge/Entrada; the appointment of the Director of Transportation; the appointment of the Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent’s Office; and negotiated policies governing employee leave, the District Advisory Council, School Bus Operators, Routing and Scheduling, and Hours of Work. 

Superintendent, Business Administrator Contacts

The Board of Education approved two-year contracts for Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe and Business Administrator Leon Wilcox. The contracts are for July 1, 2018-June 30, 2020.

Superintendent, Business Administrator Reports

Dr. Briscoe wished Haycock well in her new role. He welcomed Cindee Clawson, the new secretary to the Board and Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent’s Office. He reported on visiting schools for Teacher Appreciation Week and thanked the CEA for the professional manner in which they negotiated the contracts for the 2018-2019 school year. He thanked the Board for the past four years and says he looks forward to working in the District for two more years.

Mr. Wilcox thanked the Board for the contract extension. He also expressed appreciation to Canyons teachers, Education Support Professionals and administrators.    

Board Reports

Mr. Chad Iverson urged the Board to review Corner Canyon’s boundaries. Absent of new boundaries, he said, CSD should consider investing $2 million more for a 24-classroom wing at the high school. He also reported on attending the Middle School Honors Band and Choir Concert and various high school track meets. He also thanked Dr. Briscoe and Wilcox for their expertise and dedication to CSD.

Mrs. Clareen Arnold thanked Dr. Briscoe and Wilcox for working so hard to maintain Board, patron, and employee relations. She reported on attending the Emergency Preparedness Committee, and mentioned the importance of honoring educators during Teacher Appreciation Week. She thanked CEA, ESP and administrators for helping the Board meet the vision and mission of CSD.

Mrs. Nancy Tingey said she attended the Parent Dual-Language Immersion Meeting, which she described as helpful for patrons. She also reported on attending the Canyons District Education Foundation Spring Gala, the address by former Utah Jazzman Thurl Bailey at Midvale Middle and the Canyons District Film Festival. She also thanked Dr. Briscoe and Wilcox, as well as the CEA, ESP, and administrators. Regarding Teacher Appreciation Week, she’s glad she is able to volunteer in schools and see the great teachers in action. 

Mrs. Amber Shill thanked Dr. Briscoe and Wilcox. She reported on attending several school events and said she was elected vice chair of the Utah High School Activities Association Board of Trustees. She thanked CSD’s teachers for the impact they make on the children of CSD. 

Mr. Steve Wrigley reported on attending workshops for parents of autistic children. He attended the Open House at Alta High that was held to display the designs of the new building; the Canyons District Film Festival; and the opening of Eastmont Middle’s new “Harry Potter”-themed room. 

Mr. Mont Millerberg thanked several staff and faculty, as well as mentioning his attendance at several events.
The Canyons Board of Education and the Canyons Education Association are pleased to announce a tentative agreement regarding licensed-educator compensation for the 2018-2019 school year. The contract, a 5.67 percent boost to CSD educator compensation, is the result of extensive good-faith negotiations between the CEA and the District Administration. The salary and benefits package provides both across-the-board salary increases and one-time bonuses, continuing Canyons District’s investment in a stated commitment to attracting and retaining highly skilled, innovative, and engaged educators. Under the contract, the District agrees to a 2.5 percent, or $1,335, cost-of-living increase in addition to advancing every teacher a $900-per-year increment level on the salary schedule. Combined, the increase to the base contract will be $2,235. Also, in November, all full-time CSD teachers will receive a $500 one-time bonus, and veteran educators with continuous service with the District prior to July 1, 1998 will receive an additional $500 one-time bonus. The District will increase its share of health-insurance premiums by 3 percent, regardless of the employee’s chosen insurance plan.  Employees on the traditional plan will see a 3 percent increase; employees on the high-deductible plan will not experience any increase. The Board of Education approved the tentative agreement in a public meeting Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Members of the Canyons Education Association are in the process of voting on the tentative agreement. The Board of Education, Administration and CEA appreciate the collaboration and dedication of all parties to reach an agreement on the contract, and look forward to its implementation.
They go out of their way to make students feel special. They give of their free time to support teachers. They find resources for schools, forge creative paths around big problems and have worked shoulder-to-shoulder to build Canyons into a world-class district.

For their contributions, hard work and dedication to advancing the mission and vision of Canyons District, the Board of Education and Administration seek to recognize them. 

Canyons District is now taking nominations for the 2018 Apex Awards, the annual honors given by CSD leaders to teachers, administrators, district office personnel, volunteers and community partners. The Apex Awards, started in 2010, are the highest honors given by Canyons District to the people who help make CSD the place to be. 

Award categories are: 
  • Teacher of the Year
  • School Administrator of the Year 
  • District Administrator of the Year 
  • Business Partner of the Year 
  • Volunteer of the Year 
  • Elected Official of the Year 
  • Student Support Services Professional of the Year
  • Education Support Professional of the Year 
  • Legacy Award
Use this easy-to-use online tool to read more about the categories and to submit nominations. Nominations can be submitted until Aug. 3, 2018.

Nominations for Apex Awards can be submitted for all categories except Teacher of the Year. The Canyons District’s Teacher of the Year is selected in the spring and is CSD’s nominee in the state Teacher of the Year competition. This year's winner is Amber Rogers, a social studies educator at Corner Canyon High.  She was selected from a field of 47 teachers from every CSD school in the District.

The winners of the 2018 Apex Awards are celebrated at a by-invitation-only banquet and awards ceremony. This year’s event will be Sept. 11, 2018 at The Gathering Place at Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South.

Questions? Call Jeff Haney or Kirsten Stewart in the Office of Public Communications at 801-826-5084 or 801-826-5050 or send a note to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Next year, qualifying Canyons District high school students will be able to take college-level Spanish, French and Chinese courses co-taught by University of Utah faculty.

The unique “bridge courses” will be taught in high school but are being offered for college credit as part of Utah’s Dual Language Immersion Program, which is challenging traditional models of educational delivery and bridging the gap that has separated K12 schools from institutions of higher learning. Different from concurrent enrollment offerings, BridScreen_Shot_2018-05-02_at_9.06.45_AM.pngge Courses are for upper division (3000 level) credit, and as such, give students a healthy head start on a minor or major in their language of study.

“Dual immersion is putting pressure on our system of higher education to provide something that is not the same as has been provided in the past, and it’s a healthy pressure,” says Jill Landes-Lee, who directs the Bridge Program Advanced Language Pathway for the U.’s Second Language Teaching and Research Institute.

Dual immersion students spend a good portion of their instructional days learning a world language. They start as early as kindergarten or the first grade, and by the time they reach the 10th grade, their language proficiency is comparable to that of upper division university language students in their junior or senior year. To ensure they don’t lose ground and are able to continue to grow in proficiency, the state’s institutions of higher learning have committed to offer them college-level courses while they are still in high school — which is no small feat, says Landes-Lee. “As a university, we had to ask, ‘How do we support a student as young as 15 years of age?’ We also had to contemplate how to take a semester-long university course and extend it over a full year. We’re not just throwing another course into the high school sequence. It’s not just another elective.”

Dual immersion is catching on nationally as an effective and efficient means of achieving fluency in a non-native language. But no other state has articulated a K16 model like that being pioneered in Utah, says CSD’s Secondary Dual Language Immersion Coordinator Cassandra Kapes. “We are so thankful for the Legislative funding that is making this possible, and to be working with the state’s flagship university.”

Bridge courses, created in partnership with all of Utah’s colleges and universities, are already being offered at Jordan High in Spanish. Next year, Chinese and French will be added at Corner Canyon and Alta, and by the 2019-2020 school year, all of CSD’s five traditional high schools are projected to be offering the courses.

The courses will be co-taught in the high school setting as part of students’ regular schedules by a high school faculty member and a faculty member from the U., says Kapes. In order to enroll, students must pass the Advanced Placement (AP) Language and Culture Exam with a 3 or above in the ninth or tenth grade. Students can earn 3 credits per year, and up to nine college credits total — for just $5 per credit — giving them a jump on college and competitive edge in the global job market.

Dual immersion is coming of age, and bridge courses are the culmination of a vision for a biliterate, bilingual and bicultural Utah that was articulated years ago by former Gov. Jon Huntsman, Sen. Senator Howard Stephenson, R-Draper, and Rep. Eric Hutchings.

The Alta Hawks charged into baseball season this year with a new leader who is a familiar face on the field.

Daron Connelly, who had overseen Corner Canyon High baseball since the school’s opening in 2013, has taken his formidable talents and experience to the Chargers’ fierce intra-district opponents. Coach Connelly assumed the head coach duties at the outset of the season. 

For his part, Connelly shrugs off questions about his allegiances in the thriving rivalry between Alta and Corner Canyon. While he dons black and silver jerseys these days, Connelly speaks highly of the boys of summer in blue and silver.  

While the games are fiercely contested, there’s a kinship among the players on both sides, he said. Players at both schools began their baseball careers on the same Little League diamonds, he says. They often hang out on weekend, Snap each other on social media —  and sometimes square off at the plate.

Good-natured and competitive rivalries, he says, serve to make both teams better.

Connelly, who has earned a Masters of Business Administration and a Master’s of Arts in Teaching and Learning, brings a wealth of experience to the Alta ball club. 

The former player in the San Francisco Giants organization also has been a coach at high schools, junior highs and special schools in Arizona. His teams embrace a work-hard, play-hard, no-nonsense, grind-it-out, get-after-it style of play. He builds players from the inside out. 

“We will work together as a team,” the coach says. “If we do things right, the positive results will come,”

At CCHS, the school’s inaugural team, with 26 freshmen or sophomores, finished 5-20. By the third year, the team advanced to the state playoffs and fought to the third-place spot at the state tournament. Last year, the Chargers landed in fifth-place in the Utah High School Activities Association’s tourney.

Connelly has his sights set on replicating that level of success at Alta.

He also expects his cast of Hawks to excel academically, and he emphasizes good citizenship in the hallways, too. 

“The baseball field is an extension of the classroom,” he says.  “If the (players) are going to be high-profile (as student athletes), then we have to do it right.”

“We will talk about the process. We’ll do everything with our heads held high,” Connelly said.  “I want us to be talked about as the team that will require you to bring your A-game; the team to beat.”
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