Note: Recordings and documents for agenda items can be accessed via BoardDocs by clicking on the corresponding agenda items.


Sixth-Grade Mathematics Curriculum 

In an effort to address a mathematics proficiency-level drop from fifth to sixth grades, the Board of Education approved a proposal by the Canyons District Instructional Supports Department to start using a new sixth-grade math curriculum. The program is called “Illustrative Mathematics” and is an open-education resource developed by leading math researchers. Student and teacher materials are available digitally for free or schools can purchase a consumable student workbook for $22.50 per student. The curriculum was selected in accordance with the District’s curriculum-adoption policy

Disciplinary Fines

In the wake of changes in state law that have made it more difficult for schools to refer children to juvenile court for truancy, drug possession, disorderly conduct and other offenses, Responsive Services Director BJ Weller is proposing a new restorative justice model for reinforcing behavioral standards at CSD’s schools. The model would entail imposing fines for various transgressions as a means of encouraging students to show up for restorative programs. For first offenses, the fines would be waived when students participate in whatever intervention program is required. The fines aren’t meant to be punitive. They’re meant to serve as an incentive, explained Weller. The idea behind restorative practices is to hold students accountable for their actions and to use their transgression as a teachable moment for making a plan to ensure the misbehavior doesn’t happen again. But without the enforcement tools previously available through the courts, there is currently no way to hold students accountable. This year, as of Jan. 31, there have been 63 students cited for substance abuse violations, and only a handful of those completed the District’s Early Intervention Program. The Board will take up the matter again at a future meeting. If approved, the fines, which, depending on the nature of the offense range from $25 to $50, would take effect with the start of the 2018-2019 school year.

CTESS Update

Canyons’ Administrator of Evaluation and Leadership Development Sandra Dahl-Houlihan briefed the Board of Education on continued progress to refine the District’s educator-evaluation system.

Digital Citizenship Week Resolution

The Board of Education approved a resolution to continue sponsoring a districtwide Digital Citizenship Week, the intent of which is to empower students to safely navigate the online world and be responsible digital citizens. This year’s Digital Citizenship Week, Feb. 5-9, is CSD’s third.

Legislative Update

External Relations Director Charles Evans updated the Board on progress with key pieces of education-related bills being weighed during the 2018 General Session of the Utah Legislature. 

Cell Tower

The Board held a second reading of a proposal for a micro cell tower at Ridgecrest Elementary. According to the proposal, the tower would generate an additional $350 a month for the school. Ridgecrest’s School Community Council has given an OK to the proposal, which must be approved by the Board of Education. The proposal, presented by Business Administrator Leon Wilcox, calls for the micro tower to be placed atop a 20-foot light pole in Ridgecrest’s parking lot.  The Board will entertain the proposal at a future meeting.

Pledge of Allegiance and Reverence

The Brookwood Elementary Cub Scout Troop 4605 led the audience in a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance and Principal Corrie Barrett gave the reverence. In updating the Board on the state of Brookwood, Barrett said she could list test scores or talk about programs, but chose instead to share the results of an informal survey of parents, teachers and students. Teachers, she said, love the school because they feel part of a focused team that is striving to make a difference in the lives of students. Parents say they chose Brookwood because of the amazing teachers, parental involvement and programs. Students say they like the activities, kind teachers and inclusive atmosphere. “This is a good school where I get a good education,” said one. “Kids are nice and class is fun.”

Consent Agenda

The Board approved the consent agenda, including minutes of the Board’s Jan. 16, 2018 meeting; hire and termination reports; purchasing bids; student overnight travel plans; and new members of the Joint Educator Evaluation Committee.

Arts Education

The Board of Education heard a status update on the health of arts education in Canyons District. CSD Arts Specialist Sharee Jorgensen told the Board that robust arts programs are being provided to students in elementary, middle and high schools. Elementary arts programs reach 14,600 students. This includes the orchestra program, which draws 432 students at 20 locations. In middle school, 123 percent of students participate in an arts-education offering. How is this possible?  Some students take multiple arts class at once, Jorgensen told the Board. Arts courses also reach some 11,677 high school students. In addition, the District enjoys partnerships with the Utah Symphony, Ballet West, the Utah Film Center and the Utah Shakespeare Festival, among other arts organizations. Arts shows and music festivals for students at all levels are being planned for the spring months. 

Recognitions

The Board of Education honored the following students, teachers and staff for their achievements:
  • Albion Middle’s Sandy LeCheminant, Utah Assistant Principal of the Year
  • Eastmont teacher Louis Phillipe Vanier and Jordan Valley Achievement Coach Anne Clyde, who have earned National Board Certified Teacher status. 
  • CTEC Principal Ken Spurlock and teacher Gary Snow, Diesel Technology Program Certification
  • The following CSD Academic All-State student athletes
5A Drill Team
Alexis Kilgore, Corner Canyon

5A Girls Swimming
Olivia Huntzinger, Brighton  
Michaela Page, Brighton  
Ashley Pickford, Corner Canyon 

5A Boys Swimming
Stephen Hood, Alta  
Kevin Metcalf, Jordan

6A Wrestling
Scott Abbott, Hillcrest 

Superintendent, Business Administrator Reports

Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe thanked Jorgensen for her hard work and passion for the arts in Canyons District. He also reported on the Job Shadow Day luncheon, featuring keynote Gail Miller. Dr. Briscoe also thanked the CTE coordinators for working so hard to successfully execute the school-to-careers event.  

Mr. Wilcox attended the recent CTEC Open House, held annually to inform the community about the programs offered at the technical-education center. He also commented on the change in health-insurance providers this year, and said the District would be providing additional information to employees.

Board of Education Reports

Mr. Mont Millerberg reported on attending the announcement of LeCheminant as the Utah Assistant Principal of the Year. The ceremony was held in St. George. He also thanked Jorgensen for her work as the coordinator of arts programs in Canyons District

Mr.  Steve Wrigley also expressed appreciation for Jorgensen’s work.  He reported on visiting schools with Utah legislators and attending the CTEC Open House and the Job Shadow Day luncheon at Gardner Village.

Mrs. Amber Shill reported on attending the Utah High School Activities Association’s State Drill Team Championships.  She congratulated all the teams that competed and mentioned the second-place overall finish in 5A by the Brighton High Accadians. She also said she would be hosting a Town Hall with 1st Vice President Nancy Tingey at Butler Middle. 

Mrs. Tingey reported on attending a conference in Washington, D.C. She said she met with Utah’s elected representatives to discuss education-related issues.  She thanked teachers, students and staff for their wonderful work.  She said she’s looking forward to attending Albion Middle’s musical production. Tingey also will hold a 7-8:30 p.m. Feb. 15 Town Hall meeting at Jordan High with Mr. Wrigley.

Mrs. Clareen Arnold thanked Jorgensen for her passion and dedication. 

President Taylor thanked everyone who works hard in CSD to help students achieve — from teachers and custodians to bus drivers to nutrition-service workers. He gave a special shout-out to the secretaries and administrative assistants in offices all across the District. He predicted Canyons District would soon be known as a world-class school district.
Canyons District students are learning how to safely blaze a digital trail. 

Starting today, Monday, Feb. 5, 2018, all schools in Canyons District will begin the 3rd annual Digital Citizenship Week, which was started to help students stay safe as they navigate the online world. Special lessons will be taught in classes and morning announcements will feature tips on cyberbullying, online privacy and safety. 

Yes, the Internet is a valuable tool for learning. Every day, 92 percent of teenagers across the United States go online to complete homework assignments, conduct research, and watch tutorials in preparation for exams. But, overwhelmingly, it’s also teens go to make and keep social connections. From Snapchat to Instagram, teens are heavy users of social media. So how can parents make sure their use is responsible? And how can parents guide a pre-teen’s entry into social media? 

Digital Citizenship Week 2018“One of the most important things you can do is sit down with your children before they even begin using social media and set clear ground rules and expectations — and even consequences if those rules are broken,” says Janae Hunt, a Canyons District Education Technology Specialist.

Hunt, who appeared on ABC4 to talk about Digital Citizenship Week, encouraged parents to talk often with their children about the pitfalls of oversharing, teasing and posting too-personal information on social media sites.  Also, think twice before hitting “send” or “enter,” she says.   

“Digital footprints are permanent. A lot of time today, even college admissions boards and employers are looking at your digital trail to see what kind of person you are,” she told ABC4 anchor Emily Clark. “It is important that we are teaching our children to put their best foot forward online.” 

Another idea:  Keep tabs on what your children are posting — and who is part of their “Friends” and “Followers” lists. “Sit down with your kids on a regular basis. Go through those lists. It’s important they are friends with or follow people they know in real life.” 

Should you have your kids’ passwords? “Absolutely,” she says.  Start with an open-door policy and keep it that way: Children should know parents are watching and observing when they post or make comments. They also should know they can go to parents for help if they “see something that makes them uncomfortable.”

CSD’s Internet safety effort started with School Community Councils, which have been given statutory responsibilities regarding digital citizenship in their respective schools. In partnership with SCCs, CSD schools also are planning Parent Information Nights to discuss such issues as the filtering systems used by the District to stop inappropriate content to be accessed at school. Contact your child’s school to find out when and where their event will be held. 

Parents, teachers and students can join the online conversation about Digital Citizenship Week by following the hashtag #usetech4good on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
If you didn’t already know she was Hillcrest High’s new head soccer coach, you might have mistaken Kyra Peery for one of her players at Thursday’s meet-and-greet with prospective team-members and parents. The former college athlete stood shoulder-to-shoulder with her team captains whom she invited on stage to explain goals for the coming year, their easy banter a mark of their growing camaraderie.

“My passion for coaching is fueled by the energy that these girls bring to the program,” she said.

Hillcrest is getting a new school and a new soccer program to match. Crews break ground next summer on a rebuild of the home of the Huskies, which will include a new, state-of-the-art fieldhouse.

“Girls are going to want to come here to play soccer. We’re looking for athletes that are committed to soccer, committed to the program and committed to becoming one pack, one goal,” said Peery, who comes with years of experience as an all-conference cross country rPeerykids.jpgunner and starting midfielder at William Penn University.

This will be Peery’s first year as head coach, but she is no stranger to the team, having served as their assistant coach for three years. She’s married to Brock Peery, a popular math teacher who doubles as the team’s fitness coach. The duo will share duties with goalie coach Dan Pia, and two assistant coaches, Laura Benson and Robin Cecil, a Doctor of Physical Therapy who will bring a focus on injury prevention.

Peery is coaching to win, but not by chasing the leaderboard, said Assistant Principal Justin Matagi. “She’s coaching to build a winning team, which means putting the well-being and development of her players first.”

To build a strong junior varsity pipeline, Peery and her coaching team will prioritize skills-building, teamwork and strength and conditioning. Once players reach the varsity level, they’ll be expected to earn their time on the field. But the emphasis will always be on player development and teamwork. “That’s important. The confidence that comes from being part of a team is what enables you to do hard things. It empowers you, and you can pour this competitive edge that you peeryportrait.jpgdevelop in soccer into anything you do,” Peery told her players.

To build pride and a winning attitude, the coaches are expecting players to always wear their practice uniforms, black shorts and a gray shirt. To build up the team’s resilience, they are considering test-piloting a sports injury prevention program. And they’ll be using a popular app to keep in close communication with everyone, including parents.

“We’re lucky to have her,” Matagi said. “Just in the past month to see the energy and organization that Coach Peery and the others have brought has been amazing.”

With off-season just around the corner, there’s not a minute to lose, Peery said. “It starts here and it starts now.”
Checkmate! The Mount Jordan Mountaineers raised a flag of victory at the summit of Canyons District’s Middle School Intramural Chess Tournament.

At the end of the Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018 tourney, the team from Mount Jordan Middle, coached by Stephen Gordon, ended Midvale Middle’s five-year win streak at the annual competition for the district’s best teen players of the Royal Game. 

The Midvale Trojans finished in second place. Third place was captured by the Butler Middle Bruins. All eight Canyons District middle schools fielded teams for the contest. 

Union Middle Assistant Principal Taylor Hansen, who is overseeing the middle school intramurals competitions this year, said the competitors were well-prepared and displayed exemplary sportsmanship. “There was spirited competition during each round and on every board,” Hansen said.

The following are individual board winners: 
  • 1st Board: Midvale Middle’s Conner Nelson
  • 2nd Board: Mount Jordan Middle’s Asiah Collinson
  • 3rd Board: Midvale Middle’s Cooper Nelson
  • 4th Board: Butler Middle’s Jack Baird
  • 5th Board: (Tie) Mount Jordan’s Oliver Page and Midvale Middle’s Jason Mun
  • 6th Board: Mount Jordan’s Alan Zamora

The CSD middle-school intramural contests were created in 2009 to encourage sixth- through eighth-grade student participation in athletic and extracurricular competitions. The District also sponsors a cross-country meet, a 3-on-3 hoops tournament and a soccer championship.
Gail Miller may refer to herself as an "unwitting businesswoman." She may be unassuming and understated. But don't underestimate this quiet titan, activist and philanthropist.

When her husband, Larry H. Miller died from complications of diabetes in 2009, she could have sold the family's business empire: some 60 car dealerships and a handful of professional sports teams, retail properties, movie theaters, and more. "I certainly didn't need the headache of running a business that large, and I didn't need the money," she recalls. But she felt responsible for perpetuating the family legacy, its founding principles and its philanthropic efforts.

"I am a businesswoman, not because I chose to be one, but because I decided to continue on the path that Larry and I started 39 years ago," she said Wednesday speaking to a roomful of teen participants in Canyons District's 8th annual Job Shadow Day. "For as long as I'm able or have anything to say about the Larry H. Miller Group of companies, I will continue to promote the values upon which it was built and continue our commitment to make the communities where we do business better places to live, to work and to play."
Millerside.jpg Every year in February, a cohort of CSD students get a chance to spend half-a-day shadowing professionals in fields, such as, marketing, architecture, public works, medicine, or finance —and then network with their sponsors over lunch. This year about 100 students and 40 companies took part in the event, which marks the beginning of Career and Technical Education Month.

Gail Miller, who headlined the luncheon at the Gathering Place at Gardner Village, commended the high school-age students for taking advantage of opportunities to test-drive professions before enrolling in college or launching into their careers. Nevertheless, she encouraged them to embrace future unknowns with the curiosity of a lifelong learner. "Learn everything you can everywhere you go, because it isn't just your schooling that will teach you," Miller said. "Every experience you have is an opportunity to grow and learn and enrich your life."

Gail and Larry Miller had five children under the age of 12 when they moved from Colorado to Utah to buy their first dealership. Larry, who gotten his start as a parts manager for a Toyota dealership, "worked hard and I worked hard at home raising the family," she said. "Every penny we raised, we saved or invested." With about $80,000 in savings and a loan, the high school sweethearts took a chance — the first of many — and opened their first shop.

Built on a foundation of hard work, integrity and service, their business thrived, and every evening, her husband would come home and give her a detailed accounting of the happenings at work, she said. "I gained a lot of institutional knowledge just by watching and listening. …He was preparing me for a time that I would take on a different role and I would become a steward of our efforts."

Of course, there were plenty of knowledge gaps to fill after her husband passed away. But guided by a willingness to learn and some foundational principles, which she shared Wednesday with students, Miller found her footing. Aside from steering the company, she has overseen million-dollar philanthropic investments in education and diabetes research and helped manage the transfer of the company's ownership of the Utah Jazz to a family trust to ensure the team stays in Utah. She sits on numerous prestigious boards and is co-chair of the Our Schools Now ballot initiative that aims to raise taxes to prop up the funding of Utah's public schools.

Don't forget your roots, because that's where your values originate, she told students. Have a long-term plan and work hard to achieve it. Treat everyone with respect. Share what you have and what you know. Learn something new every day. Use money wisely and don't become a slave to it. Don't be afraid to lead. "I think fear is something that, especially for women, holds people back," she explained.

But most importantly, she said, "Wherever you go and whatever you do, do something that makes a difference."

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