Swashbuckling pirates, a jukebox legend, childhood classic, spookily familiar family, and timeless civil rights story: Canyons District’s fall musical lineup has something to please theater goers of all ages and interests. 

Tickets can be purchased at each school’s box office. Here is a list of show dates and times (including matinee performances):

Parents of middle and high school students enrolled in Canyons District's Dual Language Immersion (DLI) Programs have been invited to a meeting on Monday, Nov. 5 to learn about DLI instruction in middle and high school. 

The 6 p.m. event will be in the Professional Development Center of the Canyons Administration Building-East, 9361 S. 300 East. Canyons curriculum specialists will be on hand to discuss course pathways, high school bridge courses, and the intent-to-continue process that fifth- and eighth-graders will be asked to complete in order to continue in the program in middle and high school. This helps the District better anticipate scheduling and hiring needs for the upcoming year.

Questions? Please call the CSD Instructional Supports Department at 801 826 5045.

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With a sharp chirp of a whistle, the best student runners from all eight of Canyons District middle schools took off running with their eyes on the rolling grassy route in front of them — and their hearts set on being the first to cross the finish line.

Under sunny skies, two boy and girl runners from every grade at every CSD middle school competed on Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018 at the 10th annual CSD Intramurals Cross Country Championship Meet. They all ran roughly 2 miles around Union Middle School’s campus.

Hundreds of friends and family lined the route to cheer the students as they jostled for position and pushed themselves to high speeds.

At the end of the race, Draper Park Middle captured the first-place trophies for both the girls and boys teams.

In the girls' race, Eastmont finished at No. 2 and Union captured third place.

For the boys, Mount Jordan raced to the second-place spot and Midvale Middle snagged third place.

The overall top boy runners were Mount Jordan’s Diego Lopez, Draper Park’s Grayson Milne and Mount Jordan’s Levi Wilcoxon.   The overall top girl runners were Eastmont’s Sarah Seamons, Draper Park’s Avery Garcia and Draper Park’s Bre Kennard. 

The race is the school year’s first contest for the middle-school intramural athletics program, which was developed to promote healthy lifestyles and gauge interest for future competitive sports programs. Individual winners will be awarded medals and the fastest teams will receive trophies to be displayed at their respective schools.

See Canyons District's Facebook page for a photo gallery of the race.
Note: Recordings and documents for agenda items can be accessed via BoardDocs by clicking on the corresponding agenda items.
 
Construction of Brighton High

Business Administrator Leon Wilcox presented information about the budget and timeline of Brighton High’s rebuild. While preliminary design work started in September 2017, the work on the project accelerated after the public in November 2017 approved a $283 million bond proposal that would provide the funds for the construction. As work has progressed, Wilcox said, it’s proven challenging to build such a large building — 387,000-square-feet — on the campus’ 36 acres, especially as students continue to attend classes there. Also, construction and labor costs have gone up significantly since the bond election, he said. The cost of materials to complete such a project, including fuel, are sharply on the rise, he said. Board member Nancy Tingey, who has been involved in discussions surrounding the design of the building, said that cuts have been made already, and the investment in the school will affect generations of students. The Board awarded a $103.1 million contract to Hogan Construction for the project. Construction is expected to be done by fall 2021.

Lacrosse Participation

The Board of Education gave an OK to schools in Canyons District who want to field lacrosse teams in the 2019-2020 school year. That is when the Utah High School Activities Association will start to sanction the sport for boys and girls. The vote serves as notice to UHSAA that the District plans to participate and allows schools to begin the process of hiring coaches and reviewing equipment needs. The participation fee is expected to be $70 per player. The budget for 2019-2020 will include the startup and ongoing costs associated with offering the sport to students. 

Calendar Update

Under an already tentatively approved calendar for the 2019-2020 school year, Canyons District’s schools would let out for the summer in May, instead of the first week of June. The Board re-considered the calendar for final approval along with similarly organized calendars for the 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 years, and for Brighton High, which is under a trimester schedule. An earlier end date would make it easier for high school students to compete for summer jobs, explained Planning and Enrollment Director Dr. Floyd Stensrud. The proposed calendars also would eliminate most of the Professional Development days traditionally scheduled on Fridays, thereby alleviating the need for working parents to secure child care. There would be no change in the number of holidays or instructional days. The Board will take up the matter again at an upcoming Board meeting. 

Early Literacy Program

The Board of Education considered a series of literacy goals proposed by the Administration in alignment with new legislation and Utah State Board of Education rules. The intent of the legislation was for 90 percent of all Utah third graders to achieve proficiency in reading by 2020. School Districts are being asked to set incremental milestones toward achieving that goal. State rules also stipulate that the number of students making typical or better progress must increase from 48 to 60 percent. There are consequences for not meeting growth goals, and remediation plans to support Districts that fall short. The Board will take up the matter again at an upcoming meeting. 

Vision and Mission Update 

Research and Assessment Director Dr. Hal Sanderson presented student achievement data to the Board of Education. ACT scores from last year show CSD high school students outpacing their Utah peers in English, math, reading and science—in some areas by as much as 10 percentage points. Additionally, students showed improvement in math, reading and science. Dr. Sanderson also presented data to show progress toward the District’s customer service, community engagement, innovation, and financial accountability goals. Surveys show the vast majority of parents are satisfied with the education and emotional supports provided their students. Volunteer rates are up, as is traffic to the District’s website, demonstrating healthy community engagement. A growing share of teachers are taking advantage of District-sponsored professional development opportunities and technology-in-education certifications. The District has an eight-year track record of 100 percent compliance on annual financial audits and has maintained an Aaa bond rating since 2012.

Utah College Application Week

The Canyons Education Foundation pledged up to $10,000 to help cover the costs of college-application fees for low-income students who participate in the Nov. 6-10 Utah College Application Week. Development Officer Denise Haycock and members of the Foundation Board presented a ceremonial check to the Board of Education for the amount.

Online Mathematics Textbook Proposal

The Board reviewed an online mathematics textbook proposal, including the public input solicited with an online tool. The Board asked the Administration to solicit additional teacher feedback and provide it to the Board at a future meeting. Proposed is Illustrative Mathematics, for seventh- and eighth-grade students, and Mathematics Vision Project, for ninth- through 12th-grade students. The cost to implement both programs is less than if the district opted to maintain the traditional hard-bound mathematics textbooks, and the texts are closely aligned to Utah’s Core State Standards. If the proposal is approved, Canyons would implement the online textbooks in a layered, grade-by-grade rollout, starting with seventh- and eighth-graders in 2019 and advancing to higher grades until fall 2021.

Consent Agenda

The Board of Education approved the consent agenda, including minutes from Oct. 2, 2018 meeting of the Board; hire and termination reports; an amended version of student overnight travel requests; September financial reports; Utah

grants administration for federal and state programs, at-risk student definition and early literacy goals program goals; updates to Board’s mission and vision 2020 goals; a Memo of Understanding with Alpine District for the transportation of students who live in the Suncrest development. 

Patron Comments

Corner Canyon High teacher Royce Shelley expressed concern about the proposed online mathematics textbook.

Draper Park Middle teacher Amy Valdez spoke to the Board in support of the six-period schedule at the school, saying she thinks it best for student learning. 

Teacher Krista Pippin spoke about the proposal to change schedules at Draper Park Middle. She said the information stating the pros and cons of the sixth-period schedule and the eight-period A/B block doesn’t equally represent both schedules.  She also asked for student-achievement for the schools that have changed schedules.

Hillcrest Parent Jody Koch asked the Board to either provide a practice pool close to the school or provide transportation to swim practice for the members of the swim team. The team practices at the Gene Fullmer Pool at 8015 S. 2200 West.  She cited recent fatal accidents involving Hillcrest students as the main reason for providing the transportation.

Draper Park Middle student Aleigh Stilson spoke to the Board about the District’s dress code, saying it is out of date and sexist. 

Utah State Board of Education member Kathleen Riebe stated her appreciation for the collaborative work that’s being done by the Canyons Board of Education and Administration.

PTA Region 17’s Terri Francis introduced two Girl Scouts who had questions about the Board’s role in local government. 

Policy Update

Assistant Legal Counsel Jeff Christensen presented proposed updates to the policy manual. In the Business Meeting, the Board approved a revision to a policy to align with Utah Code for college- and career-readiness plans and outlines a schedule for minimum individual and group conferences for seventh- through 12th-grade students. In study session, the Board heard policy proposal updates that, if approved, would govern a student’s career/transition to work; eye protection at schools; and tax-increment financing project agreements. 

Pledge of Allegiance

Midvale Stake’s Cub Scout Bear Den posted the colors and led the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance. Copper View Elementary Principal Christine Webb delivered the reverence.

Recognitions

The following were recognized by the Board of Education for their achievements:
  • Leslie Jewkes, Principal, Peruvian Park Elementary, for the school’s recognition as a National Blue Ribbon School
  • Stephanie Johnston, Hillcrest counselor, Rookie Counselor of the Year, Utah School Counselor Association
  • Emilee Astle, Alta High, 5A state champion in first-singles girls tennis
  • Lizzie Simmons and Emma Heiden, Corner Canyon High, 5A state champions, first-doubles girls tennis
Superintendent and Business Administrator Reports

Superintendent Briscoe congratulated Corner Canyon High’s girls soccer team for winning the semifinal game in the 5A tournament. He wished them luck on Friday at Rio Tinto Stadium. He wished the community a nice Fall Recess. 

Wilcox said Canyons’ enrollment figures have gone up 227 students over last year’s figures. According to the reports, Alta High is now the biggest high school in Canyons District with 2,309 students. He also reviewed enrollment trends.  He also reported the Utah State Auditor’s Office will be reviewing CSD’s budget and practices to try to determine the actual costs of educating a child. He also reported on the construction fence that’s been erected for the scheduled expansion of CAB-East.

Board of Education Member Reports  

Mr. Mont MIllerberg reported on attending Peruvian Park’s announcement as a National Blue Ribbon School Award. He also said the SCC training was interesting and entertaining. He commented on the neighborhood meeting for the Midvalley Elementary rebuild, and the grant requests that were made by teachers for Canyons Education Foundation Innovation Grants. He also attended the SCC meeting at Midvale Elementary. 

Mr. Steve Wrigley attended the CTE Career Expo and toured Silver Mesa to see the facility improvements. He also reported on the good feedback about the District he’s receiving as he visits neighborhoods in his area. He requested the Board begin addressing a policy governing use of cell phones in schools. 

Mrs. Amber Shill said she is excited for lacrosse to start in Canyons high schools.   

Mrs. Nancy Tingey mentioned the SCC training and the website that’s available as a resource for SCC members. She thanked the Administration for the work on remodels and rebuilds, especially with the tight budgets given the increasing construction costs. 

Mrs. Clareen Arnold is thankful for the robust discussions at the Board meeting about important issues. 

Mr. Chad Iverson asked the Administration to work on a policy regarding students traveling to practice for activities and athletics.  He also has attended Alta’s marching band competitions, the Region 7 cross country meet, and plans to attend the state cross country meet on Wednesday, Oct. 17. 

President Taylor thanked staff members for presenting information in the study session, and expressed appreciation for Wilcox’s work on the budgets to build the new schools. 
The job market faced by today’s high school graduates looks nothing like the market of five years ago, and with the pace of change in technology, there’s no telling what tomorrow will bring.

Auto makers are already testing automated driving systems that will reduce the need to hire truck drivers, and computer algorithms are being developed that could one day replace insurance underwriters, financial analysts and even radiologists.

What does career-readiness look like for students coming of age in such a rapidly-changing world? What kinds of skills and knowledge should they be acquiring, and how?  

If you asked Jamie Hyneman, co-host of the popular TV show, MythBusters, he’d say that while accessing the right training and schooling is important, the secret to securing a fulfilling career comes down to having the right attitude. “It comes down to resilience, hard work, and self-discovery. Growing up, I discovered if you’re methodical and work hard, you can do anything,” he told high school-age attendees of the 2018 Pathways to Professions Expo, a showcase of Career and Technical Education courses available at Utah’s public schools. His appearance, a question-and-answer session narrated by Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox, was sponsored by Salt Lake Community College.hynemansmall

Before he was a TV show host and special effects expert, Hyneman was a man of many trades. In his younger years, he worked as a mountain guide, cook, building inspector, and builder in addition to laboring on farms and in libraries. At first blush, his resume might appear haphazard, or the record of someone who is perpetually distracted.

But Hyneman said he approached each of these occupations like an insatiably curious “forensic scientist” bent on soaking up all the knowledge he needed to master the job. “I didn’t start with exceptional skills. I’d follow-up, and follow through. I’d get my foot in the door, pay my dues and become an asset to the company,” he said.

His advice to students: Find things that interest you, and experiment with them—preferably not with explosives until you’re ready—be methodical, and don’t be afraid of failure. “Just be methodical and work hard and it’s amazing what you can do,” he said.

This strategy certainly comes in handy when it comes to orchestrating special effects, busting myths and inventing, which is what Hyneman is doing now for the U.S. military and venture capitalist entrepreneurs. MythBusters was an enjoyable and lucrative side gig that has given him the freedom to choose how to spend his time, he says. “My life now is about going into my shop, locking the door, cranking the music and coming out with something that nobody ever dreamed of.”

Asked by a student attendee when he realized what he finally wanted to do in life, Hyneman said, “I don’t think I’m there yet.”

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