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A familiar face will lead Hillcrest High into the shine of this fall’s Friday Night Lights.

Not only have Husky fans spotted him on the sidelines at Schick Stadium, students see him every day in the hallways and psychology class.

Ron Hill, the Huskies’ former offensive coordinator and a current teacher in Hillcrest’s vaunted International Baccalaureate program, this week was announced as the school’s new head football coach.

Hill, who also previously coached at Judge Memorial Catholic High School, was chosen after a national search. His appointment was announced to the faculty on Thursday, and Hill and some members of the coaching staff met with returning and prospective players on Friday afternoon.

“Our search was exhaustive. We really looked for the best-possible fit for us here at Hillcrest. We are confident that we did that,” Assistant Principal Justin Matagi said at the team meeting.  “With Coach Hill, we think we can keep up the momentum we’ve trying to build over the past couple of years.”

Hill, a University of Utah product, succeeds Cazzie Brown, who died a few weeks into last season from complications of a viral infection. The team, riding on a high from a berth in the state playoffs at the end of Brown’s first year, reeled in mourning — and never recovered.   

“We were on our way, you guys. We were making steps,” Hill acknowledged on Friday as players, many of them clad in Husky green jerseys, stood around him. “But then a very unfortunate incident came about that affected all of us.  It was something over which we had no control, there is no doubt about that.”

The new coach hailed Brown’s legacy and asked the team to rise above the challenges they faced after his untimely death.  “He left us with one final lesson — and we all have to fight through it,” he said.  “I want to move forward, and It’s time to move forward.”

 Hill also laid bare his expectations, both in the classroom and the playing field, for those donning the Hillcrest uniform. Failing grades — or failures to attend practice — will not be tolerated, he said. Dedication and commitment to learning will be hallmarks of the Husky program, Hill told the players.

“I’m an academic.  It means everything to me,” he said.  “You are going to so much farther with what you have up here (in your head) than with how well you can catch a football.”

But he also plans on being competitive. The “old school” training will be intensive and designed to build “big guys” and “monsters,” he said. Hill also asked the members of the team for some help recruiting more players. In order to be successful, he said, the team needs a deeper bench.  “Fellas,” he said, “I need numbers.” 

For Hill, who has started the Twitter account @coachhillhhh to communicate with the community, the chance the helm the Huskies’ football team is “absolutely a dream come true.”

“We are back online and we are fired up,” he said. “I can’t tell you how excited I am.”
Calling all bilingual 11th and 12th grade students: If you’re fluent in two or more languages, you can apply to have an official Seal of Biliteracy added to your high school transcripts.  

The Seal of Biliteracy is placed on a high school graduate's transcript by the state of Utah to certify for employers and universities that the student has demonstrated proficiency in English and at least one world language. It is evidence of a student's readiness for a career, college and for engagement as a global citizen. 

High school juniors and seniors are eligible to apply for the seal starting Tuesday, Jan. 2. The application window closes on Jan. 25, 2018.  

To apply, students must complete the following form and turn it into their school’s Counseling Center. As part of the application process, students may be required to take a language proficiency exam sometime between March 19-30. Individual schools will determine the date, time and location of testing.

As an added convenience, the District also will hold a make-up test on Thursday, April 12 from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Computer Lab at the Canyons Administration Building at 9361 S. 300 East, in Sandy.

Additional guidelines and information about the application process can be found at your high school's counseling center.

pdfApplication for Seal of Biliteracy
As Canyons District teachers, parents and students start anew in the maiden days of January, these wise words of Nobel Peace Prize-winner Malala Yousafzai ring truer than ever: “One book, one pen, one child and one teacher can change the world.”

At the outset of 2018, the Board of Education and Administration invite you to resolve to express appreciation to the teachers in Canyons District who are educating the next generation of community leaders, artists, technology whizzes and entrepreneurs. You can do this by submitting a nomination for the 2018 Canyons District Teacher of the Year. 

Nominations are now being taken for this year’s Canyons District Teacher of the Year honor. Submissions will be accepted until Friday, Feb. 2.  Per tradition, Canyons District recognizes a Teacher of the Year from every Canyons school for outstanding teaching practices, professionalism, and community involvement.

From that field, one overall Teacher of the Year is selected to represent the District in the state top-teacher competition and receives the 2018 CSD Apex Award for Teacher of the Year — the highest award given to teachers by the Canyons Board of Education.

Every school-based Teacher of the Year receives gifts and prizes donated by CSD’s generous business partners.   

This year, the Board and Administration will announce one top teacher from the elementary, middle and high school levels. Those three will receive additional honors, which will be presented at an April 24 community celebration and announcement of our overall Canyons Teacher of the Year. 

To nominate your favorite teacher for the top award, fill out the following form and return it to your school.

pdfTeacher of the Year nomination form

Last year's winner of the Teacher of the Year honor was Drew Fosse, a teacher at Union Middle School.
Asked to reflect on the whirlwind of events in recent years — the pomp of graduation from a top-tier university; scrappy early days as an entrepreneur; and launch of a billion-dollars-a-day-in-transactions trading firm — Christina Qi pauses and exhales before showing a rare moment of incredulity. 

“I still can’t believe it,” says Qi, a Hillcrest High graduate who is a rising star in the fast-changing, tech-heavy, algorithm-reliant world of high-frequency trading. “It’s all kind of surreal.” 

Qi, who left the Midvale-area school to pursue a degree at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has spent her life wisely since arriving in New England. After earning a degree at MIT in 2013, she and two friends hit the pavement, looking for forward-thinking investors who believed in their plan to revolutionize how trading firms do business.  

Contrary to business-world tradition, Qi’s company, named Domeyard, embraces a relatively flat organizational structure. While there are employees who serve in roles traditionally reserved for a Chief Executive Officer or Chief Technology Officer, everyone in the firm has the title “partner” she said.  Also, the company develops its own technologies, is selective about clients, and builds trading strategies that blend the best thinking of new and established firms, she said.

Not only has Domeyard gained a prominent foothold in a notoriously difficult field, Qi and her two partners, Luca Lin and Jonathan Wang, have received accolades for their wise-beyond-their-years instincts and commitment to hard work. Most notable: Earlier this year, the trio was named to Forbes’ prestigious “30 under 30” list of movers and shakers in the world of finance.   

The magazine says the 2017 list is an “encyclopedia of creative disruption” in 20 different industries. The hot, up-and-coming talent in such fields as art and style, Hollywood and entertainment, media, energy, sports and science are nominated, vetted and selected by the publication’s “ace reporters and a panel of A-list judges.”

Qi admits to being a little star-struck at a Forbes-list summit in October. “I was like, ‘I can’t believe I am here with Joe Jonas,’” she said about the 30-under-30 honoree meet-up, which draws current and former list-makers. This year’s list includes Jonas, actress Zoe Kravitz, DJ-producer Marshmello, Tony winner Ben Platt, and Facebook Operations Vice President Jay Hammonds. 

“That was definitely really cool.  It was like, ‘Oh, my gosh, you’re really real,’” she said about hob-nobbing with Hollywood hoi polloi. And it also marked quite a journey from the hallways at Hillcrest, Midvale Middle and Peruvian Park Elementary schools. 

With a bit of a shy chuckle, Qi, 26, who interned at Goldman Sachs, confesses to being more than a little skeptical when a Forbes reporter first contacted the company about being featured in the publication. The former student in Hillcrest’s vaunted International Baccalaureate program also reeled from the attention when the profile on Domeyard was featured on Forbes’ homepage. “My phone just started blowing up,” she says.

The magazine tells the story of Domeyard’s early days as a dorm-room enterprise, Qi’s role as the partner responsible for raising investment funds, and the late nights spent babysitting the algorithms that Qi, Lin and Wang were using to make trades in the European market.  Forbes also reveals that the name Domeyard comes from landmarks at MIT and Harvard. 

“It took nearly three years for Domeyard to get up and running,” states the Forbes story.  “Qi was effective at raising money, but the young traders needed to build up the technology and infrastructure required for data-driven trading—securing servers in the Chicago Mercantile Exchange’s data center, writing a few million lines of code, and setting up the capability to support several petabytes of data.” 

But Forbes also notes Domeyard’s “brash and optimistic” nimble nature, based on youth, small size and drive for innovation.

“The Domeyard crew is operating in a field dominated by big firms with years of operating history that have spent fortunes on infrastructure and armies of mathematicians and engineers. In addition, this low-volatility stock market era has cut deeply into some of the richest strategies of high frequency traders, causing a wave of consolidation in the industry,” the story reads. “But Domeyard’s young founders think that there are some advantages to being the new kids on the high-frequency block. The firm is working to unlock profitable trading strategies by using sequential machine learning and making large scale computations of statistics.”

Qi says many of the lessons learned at Hillcrest High stay with her today.  She also fondly recalls the teachers who inspired her, programs that gave her a solid academic foundation, and the spirit of the students who were proud to be Huskies.

In particular, she praises now-retired biology teacher Phil Talbot. In fact, in 2010, Qi successfully nominated Talbot for a prestigious MIT Alumni Association Inspirational Teacher Award. He was one of 37 teachers nationwide to be presented with the honor from the institution. “The way he connected with students … there were students in our class who became doctors because of the way he taught his class, she said.  “Once, when I was home, I ran into him (at a local restaurant), and I just broke down.  It was so good to see him before he retired.”

“Overall, I loved the spirit of Hillcrest. It was better than anything I have ever experienced, even at MIT,” she says, noting that Hillcrest High, not known for having a student body with excess personal funds, is generous to those in the community with even less. “A lot of the students don’t come from wealthy backgrounds, but they still give back … It’s a lesson for all of us.”
Monday, 18 December 2017 21:01

Two CSD Teachers Recognized by BYU

Two Canyons District teachers have received prestigious awards from Brigham Young University.

For their academic performance and observed leadership potential, Sally Williams, a health and physical education instructor at Hillcrest High, and Josh Stott, who teaches social studies at Butler Middle, were chosen to receive School Leadership Awards from the David O. McKay School ofScreen_Shot_2017-12-18_at_2.05.06_PM.png Education. The award is given to one student per cohort per year.Screen_Shot_2017-12-18_at_2.05.16_PM.png

When they aren’t in the classroom pushing their students to achieve, Williams and Stott are expanding their own knowledge and working toward masters’ degrees in educational leadership. Their tireless commitment to self-improvement and student success is an inspiration during this season of giving. When asked what drives her, Wliliams says, “I love making personal connections and helping people see and develop their potential.”

Congratulations to both of these talented, lifelong learners.
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