bond_thank_you_ribbon-02.jpg
Displaying items by tag: bond
With better insulating materials and sustainable building products, today’s schools are more energy efficient than those built 50, or even 20, years ago, which translates to lower energy bills and an immediate cost savings for taxpayers.

As schools and school districts grow larger, however, to meet demands of growing student populations, those energy gains can be quickly wiped out. Yet Canyons District has managed to reduce its carbon footprint by 39 percent over the past eight years — even with the addition of 1 million square feet of new construction.

Since Canyons’ inception, the District has worked to address the life safety and technological deficiencies of the aging stock of buildings it received from a previous school district while also planning for growth. Among 13 major school improvement projects financed with proceeds from a bond approved by voters in 2010 were the construction of the first high school and middle school in Draper.

Yet, even with these new buildings and the added burden of having to power modern teaching tools, CSD’s conservation efforts have reduced carbon emissions by 39 percent since 2009. That’s the equivalent of taking 1,473 cars off the road per year, says Chris Eppler, CSD’s Energy Conservation Specialist.

The energy savings is partially due to a push to place mechanical systems in unoccupied mode when schools aren’t being used, while the rest is tied to heating, cooling and lighting upgrades, Eppler says. “It really comes down to doing things right. If you repair, build and operate schools correctly with an attention to quality, you will reduce energy consumption while keeping classrooms more comfortable.”

For his environmental stewardship, Eppler has received numerous awards, including being named an Energy Pioneer by Utah Gov. Gary Herbert. His conservation efforts have not only saved money but have resulted in better learning environments for thousands of children.

Among other steps CSD has taken over the years to cultivate healthy schools:

WATER USAGE: Canyons is doing its part to curb water usage; the district has about 370 acres of turf to maintain. With a $15,000 grant from the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, CSD hired and trained students to help survey, monitor and adjust school water schedules based on the root zone, type of grass, shade, soil type and evaporation rate. In July 2014, the district used 16.5 million gallons less than in July 2012 and 9.5 million gallons less than in July 2013. 

RADON TESTING: The District was recently honored by the Utah Division of Environmental Quality for its radon-testing program. CSD is the only district in Utah that regularly tests schools for radon with all buildings tested at least every two years.

NO IDLING: On Earth Day, 2016 Canyons became the first school district in Utah to go idle free at all of its campuses. The campaign kicked off early in the morning at Ridgecrest elementary school where no-idling signs were installed and students greeted drivers with placards, informational pamphlets and window clings to place in vehicles. Eventually, signs were placed at all Canyons schools and no-idling pledges were sent home with students, encouraging parents to voluntarily pledge to “turn their key and be idle free.”

The City of Midvale has officially expressed support for a school improvement bond that Canyons District is asking voters to consider on Election Day.

“The City Council feels it is in the best interests of the City and its residents to support the Bond Proposal,” which would generate funds without raising taxes to “rebuild and remodel several schools as well as install windows and skylights for natural lighting at several more schools,” reads a resolution approved by the Midvale City Council on Sept. 19. The resolution was signed by all five council members and Mayor JoAnn Seghini.

Canyons District has made strides toward addressing $650 million in repair and safety upgrade needs inherited from a predecessor school district in 2009. Next fall’s completion of the remodel of Indian Hills Middle will be the 13th and final project promised to voters as part of a 2010 bond. Passing a second bond would allow the District to improve and modernize an additional 27 schools benefitting 17,000 children, while adequately planning for growth.

A detailed list of the improvement projects that would be made possible by the bond can be found on CSD’s website.



Canyon_School_District_Bond_Support_Resolution_No._2017-R-37.jpg
The recognized parent group for Canyons’ schools has endorsed the District’s $283 million tax-rate-neutral bond proposal that voters are being asked to consider this Election Day. 

The Board of the Canyons’ Region 17 PTA, which encompasses all Parent-Teacher and Parent-Teacher-Student Associations within the District, voted Tuesday, Sept 12 to publicly support the measure, which would generate funds to build and renovate schools. 

The endorsement reflects the trust and support that Cottonwood Heights, Sandy, Draper, Midvale and Alta families have placed in our schools, teachers and staff, said CSD Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe. “We are fortunate to live in a forward-thinking community that puts children first and that values education.”

Canyons District has made strides toward addressing $650 million in repair and safety upgrade needs inherited from a predecessor school district in 2009. Next fall’s completion of the remodel of Indian Hills Middle will be the 13th and final project promised to voters as part of a 2010 bond. Passing a second bond would allow the District to improve and modernize an additional 27 schools benefitting 17,000 children.

“The success of our children is directly linked to the success of our schools. All Canyons District students deserve safe and healthy learning environments wired for the demands of today’s high-tech educational standards,” said PTA Region 17 Director Tonya Rhodes said. “The Board of Education has wisely committed to turn dirt in every corner of the District while focusing on the oldest schools with the highest-priority safety needs, and they’re designing the bond so that it won’t raise property taxes. It’s a fiscally-sensible plan that will benefit generations of children to come.”

A detailed list of the improvement projects that would be made possible by the bond can be found on CSD’s website.
As Alta View students looked out of their classroom windows last year, they saw a strange shape taking place in the corner of the field behind the school.

What looked, at first, like a jumble of beams and blocks was no mystery, however. They knew they were watching the creation of the schoolhouse that would replace the Alta View students had attended since 1963.

The new, 700-student capacity school is the 12th in CSD to be rebuilt or renovated as part of an aggressive plan to upgrade and modernize educational facilities in all corners of the District. The school will open to the public for the first time on Thursday, Aug. 17 at a ribbon-cutting event. The ceremony will start promptly at 6 p.m., followed by an open house tour for students, families, faculty and the community.

The new Alta View has a new address: 917 E. Larkspur Dr., in Sandy. It is the second new facility to open this year; on Tuesday, Aug. 8, Midvale Middle debuted to applause from a crowd of hundreds.

The building will feature a security vestibule that will require all visitors to be seen by school staff before they enter the building, a large commons area filled with natural light and a grand staircase leading to second-floor rooms, a media center, activity room and a computer lab. In addition, the building will be equipped with state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems and voice amplification equipment for teachers in the classroom.

With completion of these rebuilds and the remodel underway of Indian Hills Middle, CSD will have fulfilled the $250 million bond approved by voters in 2010. It’s a goal achieved without raising taxes, while maintaining CSD’s AAA bond rating, and in keeping with founding vision of the five communities who, in 2007, voted to turn CSD it into an achievement-oriented district of distinction.
As the doors of Midvale Middle officially opened to the public on Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, students didn’t just walk toward the school’s entryway — they ran. The energy was palpable as they hurried to see what the new classrooms, auditorium and gymnasium in Canyons District’s newest school looks like.

“Whoever designed this school was a genius,” one student body officer said. From the colorful exterior to the innovative interior, Midvale Middle is full of creativIMG_8494.jpge details that are meant to inspire learners to achieve their greatest potential, says Brian Peterson, lead designer of the school for VCBO Architecture, which worked with Hughes General Contractors to create the building. “Great architecture comes from one single idea, and the idea behind this building is that strength comes through unity of different, beautiful things,” Peterson said. “We designed this school not just for 6th, 7th, 8th grade kids, but for the whole community.”  

Members of the Midvale community, including Midvale Mayor Joann Seghini; City Council members Paul Grover and Paul Hunt; Utah Rep. Bruce Cutler, R-Murray; former Canyons Board of Education member Robert Green; and former Midvale Middle principals Sue Malone, Wendy Dau and Paula Logan, attended the event and took a VIP tour of the building. Canyons Board of Education President Sherril Taylor, Board of Education representatives Amber Shill, Nancy Tingey, Mont Millerberg and Steve Wrigley and members of Canyons' administration, including Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe were also in attendance. 

The building is one of eight new schools built by Canyons District through a $250 million bond approved by voters in 2010. With the opening of Alta View Elementary on Aug. 17 and next year’s completion of a remodel of Indian Hills Middle, Canyons will have completed 13 major improvements without raising taxes and while maintaining a AAA bond rating.

Midvale Middle was first built in 1955 as a red brick building situated at the heart of a quiet neighborhood. As it sits on its original footprint, the new building features a state-of-the-art auditorium, an energy efficient heating and cooling system, floor-to-ceiling windows, a student lounge, modern media center, courtyards, soccer fields and more. “I’ve lived a long time,” Mayor Seghini told the crowd of hundreds gathered at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. “What you have here in this school is a school of the future, not the past. You have a school that has no limits to your future. You have wonderful opportunities here.”

The school will host a back-to-school night on Friday, Aug. 18 for those who were unable to attend the ribbon-cutting ceremony. Parents can meet their students’ teachers from 5-7 p.m. and enjoy a free hot dog from 6-7:30 p.m.

IMG_8494
IMG_8389
IMG_9647
IMG_8619
IMG_8609
IMG_8589
IMG_8531
IMG_8502
IMG_8476
IMG_8471
IMG_8464
IMG_8435
IMG_8377
IMG_8358
IMG_8333
IMG_8326
IMG_8288
IMG_8236
IMG_8228
IMG_8199
IMG_8169
IMG_8159
IMG_8151
IMG_8140
IMG_8138
IMG_8131
  • IMG_8494
  • IMG_8389
  • IMG_9647
  • IMG_8619
  • IMG_8609
  • IMG_8589
  • IMG_8531
  • IMG_8502
  • IMG_8476
  • IMG_8471
  • IMG_8464
  • IMG_8435
  • IMG_8377
  • IMG_8358
  • IMG_8333
  • IMG_8326
  • IMG_8288
  • IMG_8236
  • IMG_8228
  • IMG_8199
  • IMG_8169
  • IMG_8159
  • IMG_8151
  • IMG_8140
  • IMG_8138
  • IMG_8131


  • Page 1 of 4