Bond & Other Building Projects
The Mount Jordan Middle School demolition is moving along quickly. The former school is now just a pile of rubble.

The new Mount Jordan Middle is being made possible by a $250 million, tax-rate-neutral bond approved by Canyons voters in 2010. The new school will be approximately 200,000 square feet and built to emphasize such areas as science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). 
Students attending Brighton High School are sure to notice that there’s a welcome addition to their campus. 

Brighton High on Friday, Aug. 23, 2013 celebrated the official opening of the new Bengal Building. A ribbon-cutting celebration was held right before the Bengals' first football game of the season, which the team won.  

Principal Charisse Hilton asked Student Body President Mitchel Kenney to do the ribbon-cutting honors with the giant scissors. During the ceremonial cutting of the ribbon, Kenney was surrounded by Hilton, Cottonwood Heights Mayor Kelvyn Cullimore and Canyons Board of Education Members Kim Horiuchi and Nancy Tingey.

The new building houses science and computer labs, classrooms, a dance room, weight room, and other amenities that students have been eagerly anticipating. Brighton football Coach Ryan Bullet told the crowd at the Friday event, which also attracted students, parents and teachers, that the new weight room is one of the best in the state. 

Construction on the building was planned to accommodate an increased number of students attending Brighton High as part of Canyons District’s grade reconfiguration. Beginning this year, ninth graders in the District attend high school; sixth graders attend middle school. Elementary schools are for students in kindergarten through fifth grade.

See photographs of the event on our Facebook page.
A strong sense of community was a theme at the ceremonial opening of the new Butler Middle School in Cottonwood Heights on Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013. A crowd of more than 400 students, parents, teachers and patrons in Canyons District gathered to celebrate Butler’s completion and participate in a ribbon-cutting event.

“In my years of experience, I’ve learned a few lessons about how a school can become the heart of a community,” Butler Middle Principal Paula Logan told the crowd, which included such dignitaries as Cottonwood Heights Mayor Kelvyn Cullimore, Rep. Steve Eliason and Sen. Brian Shiozawa. “As American philosopher John Dewey once said, ‘What the best and wisest parent wants for his own child, that must the community want for all its children.’ ”
Less than a year ago, a damp day washed out Draper Park Middle School’s groundbreaking plans, but not a rain cloud was in sight Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013, as parents, teachers, students and patrons gathered in the evening sun to celebrate the new school’s completion.

Members of the Canyons District Board of Education, Draper City Council, Unified Fire Authority, Draper Mayor Darrell Smith, Rep. LaVar Christensen, R-Draper, and other local leaders attended the ribbon-cutting event to show their support of the first public middle school built in Draper.

The school itself was built in an astonishing 11 months, but residents in the area have been waiting decades for a middle school, Canyons District Board of Education President Sherril Taylor told the crowd of about 500 people who came to celebrate the historic day.
A charge of excitement was in the air Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013, as students, teachers, parents and patrons joined Canyons District leaders at a ribbon-cutting event to celebrate the completion of the new Corner Canyon High School.

The sun shone brightly on the crowd of at least 400 people who gathered to help the Chargers open their new school with the snip of a ceremonial red ribbon.

“It’s been a labor of love for so many people, and it’s been a privilege to work with all of you on this school,” Corner Canyon Principal Mary Bailey told the crowd. “It’s truly an opportunity of a lifetime. Now I can check ‘Open Up A High School’ off my bucket list.”

Construction on Corner Canyon High began in 2011, less than a year after voters approved a $250 million bond to renovate, build or rebuild schools in the District. Completion of the new high school marks the first time a public high school has ever been built in Draper — a historic accomplishment that was not lost on those gathered to celebrate its opening.
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